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This Episode Steve and Jenna go around the horn,talk about some Kickstarter gems and then GenCon 50!!!

Game 1
A Dog’s Life

Game 2
Ninja Monkeys

Kickstarter Game 1
Cauldron: Bubble and Boil Board Game

Kickstarter Game 2
Ninjitsu! – the Ninja card game for all ages

GenCon50

Bunny Kingdom

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GenCon 2016 has come and gone and it is, essentially, the E3 of board games. Every year dozens of board games are debuted there to be demoed (or purchased) by thousands of gamers hungry to be on the cutting edge of the hobby.

We, unfortunately, weren’t able to make the trip ourselves, but thanks to BoardGameGeek.com and a lot of press releases we have a pretty good idea of what games made a big splash there. Take a look below for a list of the games that we have our eyes on.


Seafall

  • Plaid Hat Games
  • Ages 14+
  • 3-5 Players
  • 90-120 minutes

Legacy games shouldn’t be anything new to board game fans as there have been several. The most recent legacy game, Pandemic: Legacy Season One, took the world by storm last year. Seafall, however, is different because it is the first game that has been built from the ground up as a Legacy game.

In Seafall, players take on the role of explorers during the age of sail that have discovered a new land. The map on the gameboard is empty and it is up to the players to explore the land and see what is going on.

What I love most about this game is that I have to speak about it in general terms because I honestly don’t know what happens. I know there is a story much like there was in previous Legacy games. I just don’t know what it is, and the fact that it is a completely new title means I have no context to try and figure it out on my on.

I guess I’ll just have to play it!

Scythe

  • Stonemeier Games
  • Ages 14+
  • 1-5 Players
  • 90-115 minutes

There are very few games that have been hyped up as much as Scythe has been over the past year. This is a game that was backed heavily on Kickstarter thanks to its gorgeous art and the fascinating premise. The game takes place in a diesel-punk alternate history version of post World War I. Some of the art featured in the game includes quant pastoral villages with adorable farmhouses being towered over by multistory diesel-belching mechs.

At first, when I saw the campaign I had assumed that it was a miniatures wargame featuring towering mechs and bear riders. But, as I learned more about the game I found out that it is really more about resource management and territory control. You actually can only earn so many points through battle. The rest of the points you earn are through other means.

One feature that I think really sets the game apart is the idea of popularity. Different achievements and resources are worth a different amount of points dependant upon your popularity level with the people. This means that taking explicitly evil actions that might turn the people against you can have a significant cost in the long run (that doesn’t mean they won’t be worth it though).

Star Trek Panic

  • USAopoly
  • Ages13+
  • 1-6 Players
  • 90-120 minutes

We have talked about Castle Panic before and you might be tempted to just write this one off as a simple reskinning of the original. Do yourself a favor and wipe those thoughts away right now.

Star Trek Panic adds a lot to the formula like

We’ve talked about Castle Panic before. Star Trek Panic is similar in form, but it does more than replace the sword and sorcery theme with a shiny sci-fi one. Instead, this game adds things like missions, character cards, and new mechanics.

The best part about the game though? The cardboard USS Enterprise that sits in the center of the game board while you play.

Star Trek: Ascendancy

  • Gale Force Nine
  • Ages 14+
  • 3 Players
  • 90-180 minutes

This is a big year for Star Trek. We had a new movie (Star Trek: Beyond),  an upcoming series (Star Trek: Discovery), and several licensed board games. While Star Trek Panic is a lighter strategy game based around an existing idea, Star Trek: Ascension brings the Trek universe into the heavy strategy genre.

The gameboard is all but blank when this game starts. That is because the galaxy will be discovered slowly as the three players (each one controlling either the Federation, The Klingon Empire, or the Romulan Empire respectively) travel around the board discovering new stars, planets, and eventually each other. At that point the players will need to trade, form alliances, and explore in order to earn the win.

 

Vast: The Crystal Caverns

  • Leader Games
  • Ages 10+
  • 1-5 Players
  • 75 minutes

Asymmetrical gameplay is a challenge, but is is very cool when it comes together well in a board game. Vast: The Crystal Caverns certainly shoots to accomplish that.

Vast is a dungeon crawler game that has each player assigned to a different role from the valiant knight and the slumbering dragon to the cave itself. Each role has completely different game mechanics and win conditions. For example: The Knight wins by killing the dragon. The Dragon wins by waking up and escaping. The cave wins by collapsing in itself and crushing everyone else inside.

Kreo

  • Cool Mini or Not
  • Ages 10+
  • 3-6 Players

This is a cooperative game where players take on the role of greek titans who are working to create a sustainable world. There are element cards which help you build nature cards, Nature cards are used to build the planet.

The game looks as simple as it is fast. The entire deck of cards is dealt out to the players. Gameplay involves multiple rounds wherein players while simultaneously play cards trying to complete different phases of creation. The key is that players cannot communicate directly about what they are going to play. This limitation can be circumvented by using a limited resource, but it is a pretty significant part of the challenge.

Ticket to Ride: Rails and Sails

  • Days of Wonder
  • Ages 10+
  • 2-5 players
  • 60-120 minutes

Ticket to Ride: Rails and Sails mixes up the traditional TTR formula in two main ways. The first is that it includes a double sided map that includes a world map and a map focused on the Great Lakes region of the United States. The second is that players can also claim routes across land using trains and sea using boats. They even mix things up by including train cards and boat cards that players have to collect to claim their respective routes. This adds a lot of new decisions for players to make.

We haven’t played a bad version of Ticket to Ride yet, so we’re sure this will be a great one to add to the collection.

Beyond Baker Street

  • Z-Man
  • Ages 13+
  • 2-4 players
  • 20 minutes

This is a Sherlock Holmes themed cooperative deduction game. Players are racing to solve a crime before the legendary Sherlock Holmes can. The gameplay itself is very similar to Hanabi. Players each hold a set of five clues, but they can’t see what they have. They can only see their what their teammates are holding. Each turn players can Assist another detective, Investigate a crime scene, Confirm evidence, Eliminate dead leads, or Pursue new leads. The players win if they can gather enough evidence before Holmes does.

I’ll admit that I have had some bad experiences with Hanabi, but I am definitely willing to give this one a shot.

Captain Sonar

  • Asmodee
  • Ages 12+
  • 2-8 Players
  • 30-60 minutes

Ok. So we all played Battleship when we were kids right? Captain Sonar is a game that pits two teams of players against each other as they each run Submarines that are trying to destroy one another. Each player has a separate role and the battles take place in real time.

This sounds to us like it has the makings of a great game to pull out at game nights and we can’t wait to give it a shot.

Killer Snails: Assassins of the Sea

This is a competitive deck building game that is themed around the idea of farming deadly cone snails. They are deadly creatures, but they can be farmed to harness some of their pieces to help make medicines and other useful products.

Killer Snails was designed in collaboration with the American Museum of Natural History, the National Science Foundation, and the Media Center IFP. There is even a teacher’s guide to using this game to help learn.

Fight for Olympus

  • Lookout Games/Mayfair Games
  • Ages 12+
  • 2 Players
  • 30 Minutes

Fight for Olympus is a two player competitive card game with strategic elements. The game is based on Greek Mythology so we know our oldest son is hungry for this one.

Players control six spaces on a virtual game board. Three of them are reserved for military action and the other three are for resources and “Power Discs.” Creatures played in the front row deal damage to creatures directly across from them. If there are no creatures to attack then the damage is dealt to the other player directly.

The art on the different cards looks great and the combat mechanics look interesting enough to rocket this game very high on our list.


Did you see anything at GenCon 2016 that caught your eye? Sound off in the comments!

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Board Games from GenCon 2016 That We Want to Play!

GenCon took place last month and was, essentially, the E3 of board games. Every year dozens upon dozens of board games are debuted there to be demoed (or purchased) by thousands of gamers hungry to be on the cutting edge of the hobby.

We, unfortunately, weren’t able to make the trip ourselves, but thanks to BoardGameGeek.com and a lot of press releases we have a pretty good idea of what games made a big splash there. Take a look below for a list of the games that we have our eyes on.

Seafall


Plaid Hat Games

Ages 14+

3-5 Players

90-120 minutes

 

Legacy games shouldn’t be anything new to board game fans as there have been several. The most recent legacy game, Pandemic: Legacy Season One, took the world by storm last year. Seafall, however, is different because it is the first game that has been built from the ground up as a Legacy game.

In Seafall, players take on the role of explorers during the age of sail that have discovered a new land. The map on the gameboard is empty and it is up to the players to explore the land and see what is going on.

What I love most about this game is that I have to speak about it in general terms because I honestly don’t know what happens. I know there is a story much like there was in previous Legacy games. I just don’t know what it is, and the fact that it is a completely new title means I have no context to try and figure it out on my on.

I guess I’ll just have to play it!

 

Scythe


Stonemeier Games

Ages 14+

1-5 Players

90-115 minutes

 

There are very few games that have been hyped up as much as Scythe has been over the past year. This is a game that was backed heavily on Kickstarter thanks to its gorgeous art and the fascinating premise. The game takes place in a diesel-punk alternate history version of post World War I. Some of the art featured in the game includes quant pastoral villages with adorable farmhouses being towered over by multistory diesel-belching mechs.

At first, when I saw the campaign I had assumed that it was a miniatures wargame featuring towering mechs and bear riders. But, as I learned more about the game I found out that it is really more about resource management and territory control. You actually can only earn so many points through battle. The rest of the points you earn are through other means.

One feature that I think really sets the game apart is the idea of popularity. Different achievements and resources are worth a different amount of points dependant upon your popularity level with the people. This means that taking explicitly evil actions that might turn the people against you can have a significant cost in the long run (that doesn’t mean they won’t be worth it though).

 

Star Trek Panic

USAopoly

Ages13+

1-6 Players

90-120 minutes

 

We have talked about Castle Panic before and you might be tempted to just write this one off as a simple reskinning of the original. Do yourself a favor and wipe those thoughts away right now.

Star Trek Panic adds a lot to the formula like

We’ve talked about Castle Panic before. Star Trek Panic is similar in form, but it does more than replace the sword and sorcery theme with a shiny sci-fi one. Instead, this game adds things like missions, character cards, and new mechanics.

The best part about the game though? The cardboard USS Enterprise that sits in the center of the game board while you play.

 

Star Trek: Ascendancy

Gale Force Nine

Ages 14+

3 Players

90-180 minutes

 

This is a big year for Star Trek. We had a new movie (Star Trek: Beyond),  an upcoming series (Star Trek: Discovery), and several licensed board games. While Star Trek Panic is a lighter strategy game based around an existing idea, Star Trek: Ascension brings the Trek universe into the heavy strategy genre.

The gameboard is all but blank when this game starts. That is because the galaxy will be discovered slowly as the three players (each one controlling either the Federation, The Klingon Empire, or the Romulan Empire respectively) travel around the board discovering new stars, planets, and eventually each other. At that point the players will need to trade, form alliances, and explore in order to earn the win.  

 

Vast: The Crystal Caverns

BoardGameGeek Link

Leader Games

Ages 10+

1-5 Players

75 minutes

Asymmetrical gameplay is a challenge, but is is very cool when it comes together well in a board game. Vast: The Crystal Caverns certainly shoots to accomplish that.

Vast is a dungeon crawler game that has each player assigned to a different role from the valiant knight and the slumbering dragon to the cave itself. Each role has completely different game mechanics and win conditions. For example: The Knight wins by killing the dragon. The Dragon wins by waking up and escaping. The cave wins by collapsing in itself and crushing everyone else inside.

 

Kreo

BoardGameGeek Link

Cool Mini or Not

Ages 10+

3-6 Players

 

This is a cooperative game where players take on the role of greek titans who are working to create a sustainable world. There are element cards which help you build nature cards, Nature cards are used to build the planet.

The game looks as simple as it is fast. The entire deck of cards is dealt out to the players. Gameplay involves multiple rounds wherein players while simultaneously play cards trying to complete different phases of creation. The key is that players cannot communicate directly about what they are going to play. This limitation can be circumvented by using a limited resource, but it is a pretty significant part of the challenge.

 

Ticket to Ride: Rails and Sails

Days of Wonder

Ages 10+

2-5 players

60-120 minutes

 

Ticket to Ride: Rails and Sails mixes up the traditional TTR formula in two main ways. The first is that it includes a double sided map that includes a world map and a map focused on the Great Lakes region of the United States. The second is that players can also claim routes across land using trains and sea using boats. They even mix things up by including train cards and boat cards that players have to collect to claim their respective routes. This adds a lot of new decisions for players to make.

We haven’t played a bad version of Ticket to Ride yet, so we’re sure this will be a great one to add to the collection.

 

Beyond Baker Street

Z-Man

Ages 13+

2-4 players

20 minutes

 

This is a Sherlock Holmes themed cooperative deduction game. Players are racing to solve a crime before the legendary Sherlock Holmes can. The gameplay itself is very similar to Hanabi. Players each hold a set of five clues, but they can’t see what they have. They can only see their what their teammates are holding. Each turn players can Assist another detective, Investigate a crime scene, Confirm evidence, Eliminate dead leads, or Pursue new leads. The players win if they can gather enough evidence before Holmes does.

I’ll admit that I have had some bad experiences with Hanabi, but I am definitely willing to give this one a shot.    

 

Captain Sonar

Asmodee

Ages 12+

2-8 Players

30-60 minutes

 

Ok. So we all played Battleship when we were kids right? Captain Sonar is a game that pits two teams of players against each other as they each run Submarines that are trying to destroy one another. Each player has a separate role and the battles take place in real time.

This sounds to us like it has the makings of a great game to pull out at game nights and we can’t wait to give it a shot.  

 

Killer Snails: Assassins of the Sea

This is a competitive deck building game that is themed around the idea of farming deadly cone snails. They are deadly creatures, but they can be farmed to harness some of their pieces to help make medicines and other useful products.

Killer Snails was designed in collaboration with the American Museum of Natural History, the National Science Foundation, and the Media Center IFP. There is even a teacher’s guide to using this game to help learn.

 

Fight for Olympus

Lookout Games/Mayfair Games

Ages 12+

2 Players

30 Minutes

 

Fight for Olympus is a two player competitive card game with strategic elements. The game is based on Greek Mythology so we know our oldest son is hungry for this one.

Players control six spaces on a virtual game board. Three of them are reserved for military action and the other three are for resources and “Power Discs.” Creatures played in the front row deal damage to creatures directly across from them. If there are no creatures to attack then the damage is dealt to the other player directly.

The art on the different cards looks great and the combat mechanics look interesting enough to rocket this game very high on our list.

 

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GenCon 2015 is happening as we speak and board game publishers and independent designers alike are spread out across the show floor demoing some very exciting games. Below is a list of some of the more exciting family friendly games being shown.

 

Tail Feathers

Mice and Mystics is am amazing cooperative gaming experience. Plaid Hat Games knows that they have a great game world on their hands and are in the process of developing a miniatures based war game in the Mice and Mystics universe called Tail Feathers.  It is, without question, our most anticipated game of the near future.

Mysterium

We are huge fans of Dixit here at Engaged Family Gaming. Mysterium is a game that shares some similarities in that the game is driven by people’s empathy and understanding the potential meaning behind a given image. The difference is that Mysterium has a specific end goal. Players are each psychic mediums who are attempting to solve a murder with the help of a spirit who is sending them dream images to communicate who the killer was, where it took place, and what the murder weapon was (Sound familiar?)

This will likely be a bit difficult for younger players, but will be  a great game to have around as your family gets older

7 Wonders: Duel

This game shares a lot theme-wise with 7 Wonders. The difference is that instead of drafting cards from a hand that you pass from player to player you draft your cards from a pattern of cards placed face down and face up on the table between you. Also, as the name suggests this is a game intended for two players.

Two players games can be difficult for families as they often don’t allow for highly varied skill sets, but it is hard to ignore the pedigree. Stay tuned for more info as release comes closer.

Thieves!

Thieves_Calliope Games

We posted about this one the other day when it was announced. Thieves was originally published in Europe but it is finally making its way to the US. Calliope Games does a great job of picking amazing games to publish so we are looking forward to getting our hands on this one.

Ninja Camp

Maybe we jump have summer camp on the brain since our oldest just came back from one, but this looks like a very fun little game.

Players each take on the roll of a Ninja competing to be the student of a master.  Each player starts with two cards, each of which is a ninja move, and the rest of the cards are dealt face-up on the play area. Players progress across the board and add new moves to their hand.It looks like a lot of fun

Smash-up: Munchkin

This is pretty straight forward. It is a munchkin themed version of Smash-Up. Both of these are popular games that turn genres upside down in an attempt at random humor. This looks like a lot of fun.

Broom Service


This one was a Kennerspiel des Jahres nominee for 2015. Anything that is even NOMINATED for such a prestigious award is going to be worth at least a look.

 

Nefarious The Mad Scientist Game

 

This is the second edition of a game that was released several years ago.

What kid doesn’t want to play the role of a mad scientist? This is purportedly a quick playing game where players are racing to build crazy contraptions like freeze rays and attack robots before their opponents can.

Penny Press

 

I would never have thought that I would want so desperately to play a board game based on running a news paper during the early 1900’s, but this worker placement game is doing it to me.

Players each have a number of reporters that they can spread out throughout the city to cover different stories to fill up their paper. Different stories are worth different amounts, but take up different amounts of space on the paper. Its worker placement at what looks to be its finest.

Medieval Academy

 

This a game where each player takes on the role of a squire who is competing with the other players in an attempt to earn chivalry points. The art is hilarious and it is being published by IELLO who has done some really great games in the past.

 

This list is not even close to complete. we are certain that there are tons of games we didn’t have enough room to talk about. What did we miss? Sound off in the comments!

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These days when talking about console gaming systems there are three main options; PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, and Nintendo Wii. (Editor’s Note: We know about the Wii U, we promise. We will discuss that system in a next generation comparison.)

Each console has its own history, niche, and style to bring to the table. When choosing a console it really comes down to knowing what interests you and your family the most. If you are not sure how to answer these questions, you do not have to buy the newest system on the market. There is something to be said for looking at older systems and what they offer. Keep in mind that Nintendo, PlayStation and Xbox all have an extensive history, and if this is your first walk down the console path, it is best to know what your interests are and what you will get the most enjoyment from. Are you interested in high end graphics and games that look like movies? Are you interested in iconic character games that your family will immediately be comfortable with? Or, are you interested in extensive online gameplay? Each of these interests will point you to a particular style, and it may be cheaper to investigate some consoles and games that have been out for a few years to find out what your family will really enjoy before spending the money to be at the current tech level. This is particularly important heading into the next few months, as new consoles are expected to be released by both Sony and Microsoft, possibly at a very high price tag.

With regards to the current popular systems, Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 are really very similar in capabilities and are marketed to similar types of gamers. Both systems have high graphics, speed, and memory capabilities. Both systems have additional capabilities beyond gaming. They are both capable of playing DVDs and have the ability to stream Netflix. The Playstation 3 can also play Blu Rays. They both can connect wirelessly to the internet and have subscription networks. They are capable of online play and offer the ability to download game content. Only Microsoft charges for their online subscription. It is important to note that even though the two systems usually offer the same game titles, you cannot play with friends online unless you have the same system.

Players who enjoy sports games and first person shooters are typically drawn to the hardware offered by Microsoft and Sony. The HD graphics, downloading speed and internet capabilities are all key for these systems. The Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 tend to have more mature rated games because of their graphical fidelity. Likewise, you won’t typically find mature titles on the Nintendo Wii. Although most of the games released for these two systems are playable solo or through some form of story mode and cooperative play, the most popular games offered for these systems are online multiplayer games. Both systems support a vast online community complete with online profiles, friend lists, and the ability to chat via microphone while connected and playing online. Much of the online gameplay is highly competitive and can require a decent time investment to get a sense of accomplishment or to complete achievements.

 

While it is true that the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 systems do have titles that are written for a lower age bracket and even some multi-player/party games, the selection is not as vast as the Wii with regards to titles of this nature. Overall, the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 are systems that appeal to an older demographic. Many titles released for these systems require a higher level of game play ability and time dedication.

The Nintendo Wii systems are more typically geared towards kids and families. Most of the Wii’s popular titles are built around adventure platform games or in house multi-player gaming (not usually online multi-player). The Wii uses wireless controllers and promotes active gaming. The Wii has become known for mini-game copllections and party games that can be highly entertaining for any age group. The Wii also features platform games that appeal to a broader audience than the more hardcore games that the Xbox 360 and Playstation 3 are known for. These games have a relatively short learning curve and are far easier to pick up and put down at leisure then some of the first person shooters and online multiplayer games that the other two systems are known for. The Nintendo Wii’s biggest draw comes from iconic characters that are well known and loved like Mario, Donkey Kong, and Link.

The Wii system hardware is vastly different from the other two systems. It connects to the internet and can stream Netflix (It does not, however, play Blu Rays or DVDs). There are many good retro games available on their Virtual Console as well as some WiiWare software and games available for purchase in the Nintendo eShop. While the Wii can browse online, it is less than user friendly then the other systems and it cab be difficult to use the Wii controller to navigate. Overall, the Wii is a great system that appeals to families.

Before making a final decision on which console to purchase, keep in mind that consoles have a technology cycle of about 5-10 years, but your system’s actual life cycle can average 10 years or more. Many gamers still have systems that work from 10-15 years ago or more. In fact “retro gaming” is a big passion for many of us who still have our old systems or access to the old software of some of our favorite games. Just because the next generation of system is coming out does not necessarily mean your system is obsolete or near the end of its life.

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Apex Legends Season 2 – EA Play Announcements

Apex Legends was at EA Play 2019 this year. Specifically, Respawn was there to discuss their second season of content for the battle royale shooter.

Legendary Hunt


The last event of Apex Legends first season is The Legendary Hunt. From now until June 18th, players are eligible to receive event specific weapon and character skins through challenges that are tracked through various game modes. As it is with all games in this genre, the in game store will have a rotating stock of cosmetic items in addition to the ones available by achievement.

The Legendary Hunt itself is available as an “elite queue” event, where availability opens only to someone who makes a top 5 finish in any game mode. While the elite queue is not something that is readily accessible to the family and/or casual gamer, the circulation of experienced players through this elite queue will create matches elsewhere that have less experienced players overall, and create a better experience for the family gamer.

In addition to the weekend of E3 providing double XP for base and battle pass experience, this event gives any player who top 5’s a match in any game mode an immediate level on their battle pass.

Several Character and Weapon Skins are achieved with the following Milestones:

  • Logging in with a battle pass during the event
  • 2 wins in any game mode
  • Top 5’ing any one game
  • Getting to level 15 on your battle pass before the event ends

Season 2: Battle Charged Announced

July 2nd will be the release date for the second season of Apex Legends. While all the details for the upcoming season were not announced, they were pretty comfortable with some baseline announcements:

  • New Legend (Which we go over in the next announcement)
  • New Weapon: The L Star: A fully automatic weapon that shreds through enemies and terrain that can only be found in precious care package drops. Its weapons speed is balanced by the nasty habit of over heating.
  • New Map Events
  • New Game Modes
  • A New Ranked Play Mode, with cosmetic rewards based on performance
  • Weapon and Legend Rebalancing based on community feedback
  • Possible colossal monsters in the maps

The biggest announcement relevant to Battle Charged and the family gamer is a significant change to the daily and weekly challenges and to materials granted through the battle pass and core level progression.

Daily and Weekly challenges will stack so that multiple challenges can be active at the same time. No word yet as to how many of these challenges can stack at once. Because challenges now accumulate as opposed to one overwriting the other, this creates an environment where players who can only play a limited amount of time in the week/month can get the full benefits of the challenges and their rewards. The maximum rate of leveling has become faster, allowing level 100 to be reached much faster, and crafting materials has been increased so that players can create at least one legendary skin for free with the crafting materials they acquire through regular play.

New Legend: Wattson

Scientist, Engineer, and Smartest Women on the Frontier

Wattson is the character for Apex Legends with a familiar style of play if you prefer defensive or construction based classes in your first person games. Her active ability builds electrified barriers that your allies can freely pass through. Her ultimate creates a permanent structure on the map which deflects incoming missiles, grenades and other havoc while also speeding up the cool down on her active skill (so she can put up more barriers). As a support class in Apex Legends, she has access to a consumable which lets her charge the ultimate abilities of her allies. Between the structures and the power to fuel your allies best abilities, this character is built with the strategist in mind, unless you just want to electrify all of the things. Science!

What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

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Parental Controls for Fortnite: Battle Royale on Nintendo Switch

Fortnite is one of the biggest games in the world. In fact, the only reason it isn’t THE biggest game in the world is that Minecraft is still a thing. I know a lot of parents have allowed their kids to play this new gaming juggernaut and feel lost because they don’t really know how to use the parental controls. Below are the most important Fortnite parental controls that a parent will need to know if their child is playing on iOS or Android.

Editor’s note: If you want a deeper dive into Fortnite we have two guides on our site. The first is a general overview for parents that want to know what the game is all about. The second guide contains tips for new Fortnite players (or for parents to give to their kids if they get frustrated early on.

 

Turning off Voice Chat

 

Open the Settings menu in the top right of the Lobby screen by pressing the + button

Open the Options Menu by highlighting the box with the Gear in it and pressing the A button.

 

Navigate to the Audio tab (The icon looks like a megaphone with sound waves coming out of it) by pressing the R button

Navigate to the “Voice Chat” option and toggle it On or Off by pressing the left or right buttons on the D-pad.

 

Note: There are a number of other audio options that you can adjust in this menu as well.

 

Automatically Reject Friend Requests from Strangers

 

Open the Settings menu in the top right of the Lobby screen by pressing the + button

Open the Options Menu by highlighting the box with the Gear in it and pressing the A button.

 

Navigate to the Account tab (The icon looks like a pawn in chess) by pressing the R button

Navigate to the Automatically Reject Friend Request option and toggle it  On or Off by pressing the left or right buttons on the D-pad.

 

Chat Profanity Filter

 

Open the Settings menu in the top right of the Lobby screen by pressing the + button

Open the Options Menu by highlighting the box with the Gear in it and pressing the A button.

 

Navigate to the Account tab (The icon looks like a pawn in chess) by pressing the R button

Navigate to the Chat Profanity Filter option and toggle itOn or Off by pressing the left or right buttons on the D-pad.

 

Lifetime Refund Requests

 

Open the Settings menu in the top right of the Lobby screen by pressing the + button

Open the Options Menu by highlighting the box with the Gear in it and pressing the A button.

 

Navigate to the Account tab (The icon looks like a pawn in chess) by pressing the R button

Highlight the Submit a Request button and click it using the A button.

 

Note: You only get three Refund Requests EVER. Make sure that you talk to your kids and figure out how the accidental purchase was made so you can limit those situations in the future.


Where these tips useful? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

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Parental Controls for Fortnite: Battle Royale on PlayStation 4

Fortnite is one of the biggest games in the world. In fact, the only reason it isn’t THE biggest game in the world is that Minecraft is still a thing. I know a lot of parents have allowed their kids to play this new gaming juggernaut and feel lost because they don’t really know how to use the parental controls. Below are the most important Fortnite parental controls that a parent will need to know if their child is playing on iOS or Android.

Editor’s note: If you want a deeper dive into Fortnite we have two guides on our site. The first is a general overview for parents that want to know what the game is all about. The second guide contains tips for new Fortnite players (or for parents to give to their kids if they get frustrated early on.

Turning off Voice Chat

 

Open the Settings menu in the top right of the Lobby screen by highlighting the Menu icon in the upper right hand of the screen (three stacked horizontal bars) and pressing the X button. 

Open the Options Menu by pressing the options button. 

Navigate to the Audio tab (The icon looks like a megaphone with sound waves coming out of it) by pressing the X button. 

Navigate to the “Voice Chat” option and toggle it On or Off by pressing the X button. 

 

Note: There are a number of other audio options that you can adjust in this menu as well.

 

Automatically Reject Friend Requests from Strangers

 

Open the Settings menu in the top right of the Lobby screen by highlighting the Menu icon in the upper right hand of the screen (three stacked horizontal bars) and pressing the X button. 

Open the Options Menu by highlighting the box with the Gear in it and pressing the X button. 

Navigate to the Account tab (The icon looks like a pawn in chess) by pressing the X button. 

Navigate to the Automatically Reject Friend Request option and toggle it On or Off by pressing the X button. 

 

Chat Profanity Filter

 

Open the Settings menu in the top right of the Lobby screen by highlighting the Menu icon in the upper right hand of the screen (three stacked horizontal bars) and pressing the X button. 

Open the Options Menu by highlighting the box with the Gear in it and pressing the X button. 

 

Navigate to the Account tab (The icon looks like a pawn in chess) by pressing the X button. 

Navigate to the Chat Profanity Filter option and toggle it On or Off by pressing the X button. 

 

Lifetime Refund Requests

 

Open the Settings menu in the top right of the Lobby screen by highlighting the Menu icon in the upper right hand of the screen (three stacked horizontal bars) and pressing the X button. 

Open the Options Menu by highlighting the box with the Gear in it and pressing the X button. 

Navigate to the Account tab (The icon looks like a pawn in chess) by pressing the X button. 

Highlight the Submit a Request button and click it using the X button. 

 

Note: You only get three Refund Requests EVER. Make sure that you talk to your kids and figure out how the accidental purchase was made so you can limit those situations in the future.


Where these tips useful? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

Follow us on Facebook!

Like us on Twitter!

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Subscribe to our Newsletter!

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Parental Controls for in Fortnite: Battle Royale on Windows PC/Mac

Fortnite is one of the biggest games in the world. In fact, the only reason it isn’t THE biggest game in the world is that Minecraft is still a thing. I know a lot of parents have allowed their kids to play this new gaming juggernaut and feel lost because they don’t really know how to use the parental controls. Below are the most important Fortnite parental controls that a parent will need to know if their child is playing on iOS or Android.

Editor’s note: If you want a deeper dive into Fortnite we have two guides on our site. The first is a general overview for parents that want to know what the game is all about. The second guide contains tips for new Fortnite players (or for parents to give to their kids if they get frustrated early on.

 

Screenshots courtesy of SnapperCharbs Gaming!

Turning off Voice Chat in Fortnite

 

Open the Settings menu in the top right of the Lobby screen by clicking the Menu icon in the upper right hand of the screen (three stacked horizontal bars)

Open the Options Menu by clicking the box with the Gear in it

Navigate to the Audio tab by clicking the Audio Icon (The icon looks like a megaphone with sound waves coming out of it)

Toggle the “Voice Chat” option On or Off by clicking the arrows

Note: There are a number of other audio options that you can adjust in this menu as well.

 

Automatically Reject Friend Requests from Strangers in Fortnite

 

Open the Settings menu in the top right of the Lobby screen by clicking the Menu icon in the upper right hand of the screen (three stacked horizontal bars)

Open the Options Menu by clicking the box with the Gear in it

 

Navigate to the Account tab by clicking the Account Icon (The icon looks like a pawn in chess)

 

Toggle the Automatically Reject Friend Request option On or Off by clicking the arrows

 

Turn on Chat Profanity Filter in Fortnite

 

Open the Settings menu in the top right of the Lobby screen by clicking the Menu icon in the upper right hand of the screen (three stacked horizontal bars)

Open the Options Menu by clicking the box with the Gear in it

Navigate to the Account tab by clicking the Account Icon (The icon looks like a pawn in chess)

Toggle the Profanity filter option On or Off by clicking the arrows

 

Lifetime Refund Requests in Fortnite

 

Open the Settings menu in the top right of the Lobby screen by clicking the Menu icon in the upper right hand of the screen (three stacked horizontal bars)

Open the Options Menu by clicking the box with the Gear in it

 

 

Navigate to the Account tab by clicking the Account Icon (The icon looks like a pawn in chess)

Click the Submit a Request button

 

Note: You only get three Refund Requests EVER. Make sure that you talk to your kids and figure out how the accidental purchase was made so you can limit those situations in the future.


Where these tips useful? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

 

Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

 

Follow us on Facebook!

Like us on Twitter!

Follow us on Instagram!

Subscribe to our Newsletter!

Subscribe to our Podcast!

 

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Parental Controls for in Fortnite: Battle Royale on iOS/Android

Fortnite is one of the biggest games in the world. In fact, the only reason it isn’t THE biggest game in the world is that Minecraft is still a thing. I know a lot of parents have allowed their kids to play this new gaming juggernaut and feel lost because they don’t really know how to use the parental controls. Below are the most important Fortnite parental controls that a parent will need to know if their child is playing on iOS or Android.

Editor’s note: If you want a deeper dive into Fortnite we have two guides on our site. The first is a general overview for parents that want to know what the game is all about. The second guide contains tips for new Fortnite players (or for parents to give to their kids if they get frustrated early on.

 

Turning off Voice Chat in Fortnite

Open the Settings menu in the top right of the main Fortnite page by tapping the Menu icon in the upper right hand of the screen (three stacked horizontal bars)

 

Open the Options Menu by tapping the box with the Gear in it

 

 

Tap to the Audio tab icon (The icon looks like a megaphone with sound waves coming out of it)

Select the “Voice Chat” option and toggle it On or Off by tapping the arrows. 

 

Note: There are a number of other audio options that you can adjust in this menu as well.

 

Automatically Reject Friend Requests from Strangers in Fortnite

 

Open the Settings menu in the top right of the main Fortnite page by tapping the Menu icon in the upper right hand of the screen (three stacked horizontal bars)

Open the Options Menu by tapping the box with the Gear in it

Tap the Account tab icon (The icon looks like a pawn in chess)

Toggle the filter “On” or “Off” by tapping the arrows

 

Turn on Chat Profanity Filter in Fortnite

 

Open the Settings menu in the top right of the main Fortnite page by tapping the Menu icon in the upper right hand of the screen (three stacked horizontal bars)

Open the Options Menu by tapping the box with the Gear in it

Tap the Account tab icon (The icon looks like a pawn in chess)

Toggle the filter “On” or “Off” by tapping the arrows.

 

Lifetime Refund Requests in Fortnite

 

Open the Settings menu in the top right of the main Fortnite page by tapping the Menu icon in the upper right hand of the screen (three stacked horizontal bars)

 

Open the Options Menu by tapping the box with the Gear in it

Tap the Account tab icon (The icon looks like a pawn in chess)

Tap the “Submit a Request” button.

 

Note: You only get three Refund Requests EVER. Make sure that you talk to your kids and figure out how the accidental purchase was made so you can limit those situations in the future.


Where these tips useful? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

Follow us on Facebook!

Like us on Twitter!

Follow us on Instagram!

Subscribe to our Newsletter!

Subscribe to our Podcast!

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