Home » Kickstarter » Page 6
Tag:

Kickstarter

Homeschool Games
2-6 players
10+ minutes (depending on player number and skill)
COMPETITIVE

 

“….Texas has Austin, then we go north

To Massachusetts’ Boston, and Albany, New York

Tallahassee, Florida, and Washington, D.C.

Santa Fe, New Mexico, and Nashville, Tennessee.

Elvis used to hang out there a lot, ya know.” – Wakko’s America

 

Who can forget the immortal words of the genius that is Wakko Warner, as he fiddled his way through the capitals of all 50 states? Sadly, since the retirement of the Warner Brothers (and the Warner sister), there has been a severe lack in fun ways to learn geography!

Have no fear!  State Master is here!

State Master is a quick competitive game that allows children to learn state trivia in an engaging way! It’s like the U.S. State version of trivial pursuit with the initial roll mechanic of most board games.  Each of the 50 state master cards are double sided, with the state flag & name on the front and six state facts on the back.

To play State Master, five cards times the number of players are placed flag side up ten for two players, thirty for six, etc.) as well as a blank political map of the United States (which is labeled on the back). Players then chose their dice and roll, seven dice are provided, six different colored dice that basically act as player’s pieces and one special die.  The person that rolls the highest places their die on the state of their choice and so on down – the instructions do not provide any guidance on ties, so we rerolled ties – though whatever your house rules for ties are would work fine.

After all the dice are placed, the first player for the round rolls the special die which chooses the category of trivia. The categories are:

  • Abbreviation
  • Capital
  • Largest City
  • Year of Statehood
  • Nickname
  • Population Rank

Each player must then answer for their state.  If they are correct, they must then chose their state on the map, in order to win the card.  Each round progresses the same way until their are fewer cards on the board than there are players in the game.

State Master is overall a pretty fun game in the educational realm, and I was surprised at how little I knew, even about my home state! It definitely has some great learning and memorization potential and the cards could even double as flash cards if you were so inclined.  Replayability will likely be high for a while until your children have mastered most of the data, however; in a classroom setting, this game could be fantastic and would likely never grow old.

There is no age range for this game, which makes sense, as you could easily read the answers to a younger child, though reading at a moderate level would be required to play independent of an adult.

All in all, State Master is a fun and well thought out game that has a price point of $15 or less (if you get in early) and is worth it for helping your child learn more about the country we live in. State Master is currently on Kickstarter and will end its campaign (appropriately) on July 4th!  As Wakko would say it’s “Faboo”!

 

10 comments
0 FacebookTwitterGoogle +PinterestReddit

Math 4 Love 2-4 Players Ages 10+ 15+ Minutes (Highly dependent on skill) COMPETITIVE/KICKSTARTER

Racing into a growing spiral, faster and faster as the magnitude increases monotonically. Decahedrons, your only ally to your nigh indivisible goal, the Prime goal, one-hundred-and-one.

Prime Climb is a game of decision making and strategy that has you competing with your opponents to get your pawns to the safety of the board’s final number. As if it were the progeny of Sorry! and Chutes and Ladders, Prime Climb employs both the sequential numeric board, a single occupant mechanic (where you might be compelled to say “Sorry!”) and a “Home base”-esque aspect for the space labeled 101. Prime Climb utilizes all of the simplicity of these classic games, but it offers far more depth!

The first main difference is the dice, Prime Climb shirks the standard six-sided be-pipped cubes we are all so familiar with in exchange for two ten-sided dice. These dice are used to move around the board and can be added, subtracted, multiplied or divided against the number a pawn currently occupies. Since each die is counted singly and can apply to either of your two pawns, turns can take some time as children mathematically plot the best next move. (Make sure to be patient!)

Doubles also provide a twist, when two identical numbers are rolled, players have four copies of that number to use on their turn! Roll two 9’s, you can take one pawn to 81 from 0, and the other to 18, and so on. The single occupier rule also applies to your own pawns, so it’s worth remembering especially in this case.

The biggest difference is the board, it uses six different space colors (seven if you count black at the 0, or starting space). Grey, orange, green, blue, purple, and red adorn a black board arranged in an Archimedean Spiral, however if you were looking for a Candy Land-esque repetition you are in for a surprise!

Prime Climb uses these colors to represent the first of the early primes. Orange represents 2 and all factors of 2 that follow have an orange segment in their space. So, four would be split with two (2×2) orange halves. Three is green, so the six space (3×2) is half-orange, half-green, and so on! Red spaces are reserved for primes, and as numbers increase to have higher magnitude prime factors, those numbers printed in the red space of the factor. Primes have the added bonus of allowing you to draw a card that adds some additional effect to your turn (or a future turn).

That’s right, Prime Climb uses color to represent prime factorization! This innovative method of teaching children how to multiply and divide allows even young minds to engage in learning via pattern recognition.

To test out the idea that this could work with a younger child, I played with my four-year-old daughter, who loves patterns and can only add and subtract numbers up to 10. After studying the board and explaining to her how it worked, she invented her own basic game — she decided to determine the factors of the numbers in her fortune cookie (You know, those 6 lucky numbers that are printed under the Chinese word for Shoe).

She was able to follow the spiral, and identify all of the factors of each of the numbers (though I’ll admit that the first three were 7,19 and 43 so that did make it easier)! When we played the game we had to assist her with determining where she should move, since the decision making process with two pawns is far harder than you’d expect once you’ve made it to the larger numbers! But we were able to show her where she could move by teaching her to look for the colors!

As an example, let’s say you were on 6, it has factors of 2 (orange) and 3 (green), and you rolled a 7 (purple). To determine where 7 would take you if you multiplied, you just need to find the first space that has three segments in orange, green & purple which is 42, the product of 6 x 7!

It takes patience to play it to a younger audience, but it is definitely a possibility to help introduce the artistry of mathematics to a child before they learn it as rote memorization and “plug and chug” problem solving.

All-in-all Prime Climb is a fantastic family game for the mathematically inclined and for those who like fun. I was lucky enough to get a print-and-play review copy to check out while it runs on Kickstarter, and you could too! The print and play runs $15 and comes with a matching multiplication table and hundreds chart, for the full game experience you can back at the $35 level and get those same printable files!

Prime Climb is fully funded and on their way to some great stretch goals! Check them out before the campaign ends June 6th!

Looking for more games and math? Check out more articles here!

trenbolone enanthate cycle
winstrol cycle
halotestin
andriol bodybuilding
deca durabolin
sust 250 side effects
9 comments
0 FacebookTwitterGoogle +PinterestReddit

2-4 Players
Ages 10+
10-15 minutes

COMPETITIVE

Have you ever dreamed of being an enzyme? Do your thoughts drift to Adenine, Guanine, Thymine and Cytosine more than you’d like to admit? Have you ever wished you could act just like mRNA? Well, you’re in luck!

Linkage is a fast-paced game of DNA transcription… that’s right, DNA transcription!  Players create a shared strand of DNA from a deck of beautifully designed nucleotide cards, and then use their own hand of RNA nucleotides to try to match it.  It’s as easy as protein synthesis!

I know what you’re thinking, “I left my DNA Helicase in my other genome”! It’s OK, you won’t need it with this game!  Gameplay starts with each player drawing 4 cards from the RNA deck, and laying out the DNA promoter next to the DNA deck.  The promoter starts the nucleotide sequence that you will need to try to match to when transcribing your strand. Each subsequent DNA card has a secondary color that corresponds with the color of the RNA nucleotide cards in your hand.

Play starts by laying the first card of the DNA deck next to the promoter, the oldest player then must draw a card and must play a card.  Of course, the goal is to match the laid down DNA card, however, that may not be an option! Once a card is played, the next player completes a draw-play turn.  The turn ends and the next nucleotide is drawn in the DNA strand.

Since RNA transcription is never as simple as it sounds, there are some other mechanics at play.  Chaperone cards act as a wild card and can replace any active nucleotide in your strand, DNA Mutation allows a player to switch out a card in the DNA sequence and any RNA card marked as a Mutation can steal a card from someone else’s RNA strand.

The round continues until the Terminator (no relation to John Connor’s T-800) is drawn.  Players then add up their points for the round, gaining points for each card in the sequence that matches the parent strand, and racking up bonuses for long strands.

Currently, there is no suggested “best play” number of rounds, but our test went well with three.  Playing like a classic card game, Linkage is very much a learning game that puts the entertainment in edutainment. Color matching lends to play with younger kids interested in science, while the more complicated strategic mechanics will keep older kids ribosomes revved up for transcription!

I can’t imagine a better game to teach budding scientists (or even those struggling with the concept of Uracil as a general agent of confusion) some tough concepts through play.  Though many of the mechanics seem advanced, little reading is necessary, as the game can be played via symbol and color recognition.  Children who have mastered games like UNO and Phase 10 might struggle a little with the DNA Mutation and Chaperone cards, but would be able to grasp it after a few rounds of guided play.

Now that the Kickstarter has ended, Linkage has a $19.99 price tag and is available here!

2 comments
0 FacebookTwitterGoogle +PinterestReddit

There is nothing in this world that a child loves more than playing a game with their parents… Except dinosaurs.

I was lucky enough to have a chance to play Super Tooth this past week with my family. I’ll admit that I had my doubts when the game arrived. It looked too simple. But, Super Tooth hides its complexity well. So well, in fact, that you might not notice it if you aren’t looking for it. That is one of the secrets of a good family game in my eyes.

Super Tooth is, at its core, a matching card game. Players are tasked with collecting matched sets of plant eating dinosaurs. Each turn a “landscape” of three cards is laid out on the play area. Players will then resolve event cards (like the egg that lets the player bring back a card that had previously been discarded), feed or chase away meat eaters, and then ultimately choose one type of plant eater from the board. There is some luck involved here, but it is important to choose carefully to make sure that you are getting matched sets and not just random cards.

The game itself includes the cards (the number will vary depending on how many expansions you are using, and “Cretaceous Coins” that are used to help keep score. The cards were thick enough that they would survive through a lot of play, but it would be best to protect them from little hands whenever possible. They would fit very well in standard card protectors.

My youngest son feels left out of a lot of gaming sessions because a lot of the games that cycle through our home require reading or advanced strategies that he struggles with (being five). He was in all his glory while playing Super Tooth. He was able to grasp the basic gameplay mechanics quickly and was able to implement his own strategies after his first game.

What turned this pleasant surprise into a best case scenario was the level of engagement from everyone playing. My brother was playing with us and he tends to stick with “deep strategy” games and he enjoyed himself (even if he was getting beaten by a five year old)! Super Tooth may be a matching game at its core, but the way that it is played turns it into a sort of drafting game. Players who pay attention to what other players are picking up and discarding will be able to employ strategies like counter-drafting (taking a card that your opponent needs even if it isn’t beneficial to you). My eldest son did that without giving it a name.

I’ll cut to the chase here folks. Super Tooth is an amazing game, but it might not see the light of day without a little help.  Do yourself a favor if you have younger kids and buy this game. You will not regret the chance to play this great game with them (and lets admit it… you like dinosaurs too.)

Supertooth was picked up by Gamewright for 2015!  Find out more here!

the z store
2 comments
0 FacebookTwitterGoogle +PinterestReddit
Hero Generations: Bringing New Life to the Strategy Game Genre

“What is worth our limited lifetime?

What do we sacrifice to pursue the things we love?”

These are heavy themes that are not commonly explored in video games, but Heart Shaped Games plans to do just that with Hero Generations. The game is currently on Kickstarter and is approaching its goal (90% at the time of this writing) with less than two weeks to go.

Hero Generations is a strategy game that forces players to make very careful choices. Each turn represents one year of a characters life so you need to think carefully about each move in order to keep your character’s family line continuing forward.

The harsh reality of Hero Generations is that if you fail to have a child to take your place before you die then it is Game Over. This means you can’t just ride off into the sunset at an old age, or go out in a blaze of glory. You need to balance your wild adventurous side with your inner homebody to make sure that you are able to attract a bride (or groom) and have a successor.

Players will be presented with FAR more than they can accomplish in one lifetime and will be forced to make tough choices along the way. Should they develop their kingdom and infrastructure (making it easier for their offspring to move around)? Should they go on a wild adventure (and have a greater chance to bring back wealth)? Should you settle down and have a child early (making it more likely to carry on the family line)? These are the kinds of gameplay decisions that players will be asked to make.

Most strategy games are so grand in scope that the value of time and of the day-to-day human experience is lost. Hero Generations does the opposite. It pleads with its player to remember that life is precious and to cherish every bit of it.

Hero Generations is being developed for PC, Mac, Linux, and the Ouya. It is expected to be delivered sometime early next year (but that could change). This game needs to exist and it might not see production without our support. Get on over the Kickstarter and be a hero!

 

1 comment
0 FacebookTwitterGoogle +PinterestReddit

Protean Games
Ages 8+
2-6 Players
30+ Minutes
COMPETITIVE

This weekend at PaxEast the EFG team had the overwhelming privilege of getting to try out some fantastic new games prior to release. Even better… we finally got to try a game that is currently on Kickstarter. (Why don’t you go ahead and back it now. You’ll want to at the end anyways. Then come on back and read about it.)

Mix! is a Card Game of Tactical Color Theory. (Don’t worry, I had no idea what that meant either until I played!) The goal of the game is simple. Players make moves that place game pieces in strategic positions on the palate play board by mixing colors. These colors are used to earn Victory Points which decide the game.

In starting the game, each player draws one two-sided goal card with a primary color on the front and a secondary on the back. The card is places primary side up in front of each player, giving other players the opportunity to counter their quest for obtaining points. What their opponents don’t know is what the color they lose points for is, which creates an interesting counter strategy for players.

Then players draw two pattern cards. Pattern cards make up the major strategic plays of the game and depict a grey version of the palate board with variable objectives. These objectives can be applied to any color, as long as you can turn it in some way to match the configuration. These cards are kept secret to start and are nor revealed until they can be scored. Since these cards might be more difficult to understand with smaller players, this dynamic can be removed or graduated to in advanced play.

A number of Painting tokens are handed out, based on the number of players in the game. These are used to actually tally the score in the game. (We’ll explain these more in a bit.)

Finally, each player is dealt three cards from the draw deck. These cards represent the colors they have available to Mix! as well as some special cards that clear or reset pieces on the board. One of the coolest design elements of this game is now in the players hands: each color card is unique a unique brush stroke even among identically colored cards! The beautifully simplistic card composition will make you feel as if you looking at a new piece of abstract art with every draw.

Game play is turn-based, with the order consisting of a mandatory play phase, an optional action phase and a mandatory draw phase. When playing a card, each player chooses a primary color (or one of 2 special cards) from the masterpiece that is their hand to the play area. They may then choose to pass, “Mix”, “Paint”, or choose another pattern.

Mixing involves taking two (or more) primary colors and combining them to create a color.  Two blue cards move a token from the center of the palate to the blue area, a red and a blue move a token from the center to the purple area, and so on. While most older kids will get more strategy lessons out of this piece of the game (making patterns, setting up to score, etc.), allowing a younger child to assist in the possible identifying color combinations could be a fun “little sibling” activity (even if they try to make purple out of red and yellow). While tokens move around due to mixing, the score doesn’t change while players jockey for position, until someone takes a Paint action.

Scoring is player driven, with players using their action and spending a Painting tokens to update the score. What this means is that each color that has at least one game piece in it scores one counter (and only 1), and anyone with a pattern card that can be completed may complete it at that time. Scores for players are not tallied or recorded in this phase, as secondary colors are not revealed until the end, but score tokens add up! This is one of the most unique aspects of this game (and possibly the most difficult for younger players to grasp); wisely spending your Painting tokens to maximize your own points is harder than it sounds.

Choosing a pattern is always the same: draw two, chose one, put the other on the bottom of the deck. You don’t lose points for uncompleted patterns, but you are limited to 2 unplayed patterns at a time, so it’s important to choose the ones that seem most likely to be completed. The harder a card is to complete, the more it’s worth in Victory Points.

Play continues until the draw deck empties, which went pretty quickly, even for our group of brand new players. A final score phase happens, and the points are tallied. All players receive 1Victory Points (VP) for having Painting tokens remaining, 2 VP for each score counter in their primary color, and -1VP for each in their secret secondary color.

Mix! is a very fun game that is not only aesthetically interesting and well thought out, but also a fantastic strategy teaching tool for children who have mastered more complex strategy games like UNO. While reading is not necessary, some modification might be necessary for play with children who have not yet reached this gaming milestone. This game was designed to be played with children, and seems like the kind of game that would lend itself well to house rules and even adult only play!

Kickstarter is a tricky creature. If we don’t put the effort into helping Protean Games this amazing game might not see the light of day. That would be a shame, so make sure to check out Protean Games’ Kickstarter and help them get it made!

 

mens fitness
2 comments
0 FacebookTwitterGoogle +PinterestReddit
Older Posts

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More