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unravel two logo

Unravel Two from Coldwood Interactive was announced during the EA play event today, and it is available for download right now on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Origin.

EA held their annual EA Play event this Saturday, They showed off a wide array of games from Madden 19 to Star Wars Battlefront II, but seeing Yarny on screen got everyone in the room here to bolt upright. We loved the first game, even if it was a little hard.

The biggest difference this time around (aside from the fact that its available on PS4) is that Unravel Two features local co-op play. As you can see in the trailer above Yarny has been lost, but finds a friend and makes an instant connection. Yarny and his new companion need to use that newly formed connection in order to complete obstacles and overcome platforming challenges. Fans looking to connect with their friends online should beware though. This is a local co-op game only. There is currently no option for online play!

Co-op play isn’t required though. You can play the game alone, but you will have to control Yarny’s blue friend yourself. We’ll have to play the game to see whether or not that is too awkward for inexperienced gamers to manage. We’ll have a review available ASAP on Engaged Family Gaming.

What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

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EA Origins Access Vault – Family Friendly Games List

One of the premier features of the EA Origins Access program  is unlimited access to games in the EA Origins Access Vault. Below is a list of all of the family friendly video games that are in the vault currently.

Sign up here!

Other Guides

There are a ton of other premium video game services out there so we wrote guides for all of them.  Take a look below:

A Parent’s Guide to EA Access

A Parent’s Guide to Xbox Live Gold

A Parent’s Guide to Xbox Game Pass

A Parent’s Guide to PlayStation Now

A Parent’s Guide to PlayStation Plus

A Parent’s Guide to EA Origin’s Access

What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

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Wizard of Legend

Release Date: 05/15/2018

Available on PC, Xbox One, PS4, Nintendo Switch

Price: $15.99

Developer: Contingent99

Publisher: Humble Bundle


If I took all of the best parts of Gauntlet and mashed them up perfectly with Avatar: The Last Air Bender I still don’t think I would have a game that is as good as Wizard of Legend.

I spent a lot of time playing cooperative games with my brother when we were kids. One of our favorites was Gauntlet. Neither of us were particularly good at games (he has since gotten much better than me) so we needed to work very hard to even clear a few maps. It was a challenge for us, and it was frustrating, but we would talk and plan for hours about how we would try to work together. The local cooperative play in Wizard of Legend evoked so many of those same feelings. I was terrible, and so was my oldest son. But, we both desperately wanted to be better, and, eventually, we did just that. It was a wonderful experience that we’ll both remember for a long time.

It may have been hard to succeed, but it wasn’t hard to play. We were both able to weave our basic spells into powerful routines that crushed our enemies as we whirled around the screen. Over time it became more like a dance than anything else. This dance became more complex as we earned more chaos gems during our runs through the game and used them to buy newer, more interesting, and more powerful spells.

There is no real story per se. You play as a wizard, or pair of wizards, who is completing a set of trials. These trials consist of a set of procedurally generated levels that follow a pattern of two basic stages attuned to an element (fire, ice, or earth) followed by a grand wizard boss. This pattern repeats three times. The key is that you don’t get a chance to recover health or save your progress in between stages. If you die, then your run is over and you have to start over. The only things you can keep are the chaos gems that you earn for defeating enemies.  The spells you buy each fit into an element which helps determine their behavior and the type of damage they deal. Balancing the spells in your load out to make sure that they match both your play style and the types of enemies you expect to be facing is critical. This is especially true because many of the spells in the game affect your movement.

Each of these procedurally generated levels is populated by monsters that appear in patterns depending on the shape of the room. Some of the enemy groups can be brutally unfair, but skillful play and the appropriate spell selection will usually help bail you out. The enemy variety is lacking though. Many of them look like the same monster with a very small variation in powers.

At some point I have to talk about the name though right? I’ve been avoiding it, but I can’t just ignore it.”Wizard of Legend” is, as a title, about as inspired as soggy toast. It does a terrible job of cluing players in to the game that they will be playing. Here’s hoping that enough players can look past the name to get to the great game that lies behind it.

Family Gaming Assessment

Wizard of Legend is rated E 10+ by the ESRB for Fantasy Violence.

It was rated PEGI 7 “because it contains violence that lacks any apparent harm or injury to fantasy or mythical beings and creatures and non-realistic looking violence towards characters which although human are not very detailed.”

I think these ratings are accurate. There is no doubt that it is a violent game, but all of the action is directed at inhuman monsters.

Playability

Wizard of Legend is accessible. It doesn’t require complicated button combinations to move around the map and attack enemies. It is, however, very hard and will likely be frustrating to younger gamers (or older ones for that matter) who are easily frustrated.

There is a fair amount of text to read. You need it to help understand what your spells do. But, it isn’t essential. Younger gamers could get by with help from a more experienced reader.

Conclusion

I would recommend Wizard of Legend to a family that is looking for a challenge to take on together. Its ideal for siblings or a parent-child combo that enjoy playing games together and coordinating strategies. I truly enjoyed my time with my son while playing this game.

Buy it on the Humble Bundle website here.

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A Parent’s Guide to EA Origins Access

It seems like everyone is starting their own premium gaming service these days. It can be tough for parents to be able to tell the difference between Xbox Live, PlayStation Plus, and all the others. We can’t let that stand here at EFG so we wrote up a big ol’ guide for all of the premium services so our readers can tell them all apart and understand the costs and benefits of each one.

Take a look below for our guide to Origins Access!

The Pitch

Origins Access is a PC subscription service run by Electronic Arts that gives subscribers early access to EA games, discounts on digital purchases, and access to the “Origins Vault.”

How Does it Work?

Subscribers gain three benefits from their Origins Access membership.

  • Early Access to EA games – This usually amounts to a 3-4 day early access period where you can play the game for free prior to its launch date. Your game progress carries over to the full version if you choose to purchase the game after it comes out.
  • Discounts – Subscribers get a 10% discount (at least) on the digital purchase of games on Origin (An EA PC gaming platform that is similar to Steam). Games purchases using the discount remain yours without restriction after your subscription lapses.
  • Origins Vault – Subscribers get access to the Origins Vault. This is a list of older PC titles that is regularly updated. Most EA titles end up on the services 6-9 months after release. As of right now EA has stated that they don’t intend to remove older games from the Vault, but the terms of service do indicate that they reserve the right to do so.

How Much Does it Cost?

You can pay for your Origins Access subscription monthly for $4.99 or Annually for $29.99.

EA Access vs Origins Access

A lot of people get confused by these two services considering they have similar names and are both operated by Electronic Arts.

Origins Access is a PC gaming service. All of the benefits are for PC games only.

On the other hand, EA Access is a console service. In fact, it is limited to the Xbox One. All the benefits of THAT service are limited to subscribers on that console.

Advice

Origins Access is a valuable service for people who regularly play Electronic Arts games on their PC. It’s appeal is pretty limited beyond that though. It also requires that the games be downloaded using the EA Origins platform.

Other Guides

There are a ton of other premium video game services out there so we wrote guides for all of them.  Take a look below:

A Parent’s Guide to EA Access

A Parent’s Guide to Xbox Live Gold

A Parent’s Guide to Xbox Game Pass

A Parent’s Guide to PlayStation Now

A Parent’s Guide to PlayStation Plus


Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

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PAX East 2018: Living My Childhood Dreams with Sleep Tight from We Are Fuzzy

Every kid I know build pillow forts and pretended to defend their living room from something. Sleep Tight  by We are Fuzzy gives us the chance to relive those childhood memories in video game form. I was fortunate enough play a lengthy demo of the game and I came away very excited.

Sleep Tight is a twin stick shooter at its core. Players control one of a group of awesome kids, each with our own special abilities and starting weapons. The goal is to defend your living room from monster attacks each night. You do that my spending each day building defenses like pillow forts and setting up foam dart gun turrets to hold off the attackers. Once night falls you run around your room eliminating foes as you try to survive for one minute.

One. Minute.

That’s doesn’t seem like a long time, but when an unending army of monsters is attacking for that entire time it feels like an eternity. The challenge is amped up even further by your limited ammunition supply. Resource management and careful planning are key. I thought that would undermine the fast action, but it didn’t. I had to use everything available to me to be able to survive each wave. I barely survived my first few waves and eventually ran into a night where my defenses were overwhelmed (#steveisbadatvideogames). I wasn’t frustrated though. I knew what I did wrong in my demo right away and adjusted my plan immediately.

Another thing that helps Sleep Tight stand out from the crowd is the gorgeous visuals. The team is comprised of a group of developers including  Maxx Burman, whose credits include Far CryLeague of LegendsWestworld, and Titanfall. Disney character artists, including Dylan Ekren, who worked on Wreck It Ralph and Zootopia, and Ubisoft designer Oscar Mar, whose resume cites the Far Cry and Rainbow 6 franchises. It is easy to see why this game looks so awesome when you look at that pedigree. When I spoke to them at PAX East they told me that they wanted to make a game that looked like a Pixar movie come to life. Mission accomplished!

Sleep Tight is coming this summer to PC and to the Nintendo Switch and I can’t wait to get my hands on it.

What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

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PAX East 2018 – Saving the World in Earthnight!

Earthnight, by Cleaversoft, is a procedurally generated infinite runner hand painted in an anime style set during a dragon apocalypse. coming to PS4, PSVita. and PC/Mac later this year. That sure is a lot to unpack, but it my demo was so good when I played it at PAX East that its worth digging in to every detail we can about it. The game has been in development for several years at this point. So long, in fact, that it started when infinite runners were just starting to pick up steam on mobile devices. The team  at Cleaversoft wanted to make a game together and decided on a project that improved on the genre by adding more depth. They wanted to take Infinite runners to new heights so they decided to go into space… with dragons.

 

The most striking thing about Earthnight is the art style. Every frame of animation is hand drawn by a brilliant artist in an anime style. The two main characters, a 14 year old girl name Sydney and a freelance photographer named Stanley, are beautifully animated. Their detailed running and jumping animations each help to give them as much personality as a few dozen pages of dialogue and backstory. Even the character selection screen serves to illustrate their character.

The level design is important, too. The team created something they like to call “hand-designed procedural generation.” They divide each dragon into three different core components: a beginning, a middle, and an end. Each of those components has at least five different hand-designed variations that spawn based on a set of rules. This means that players will be able to master the different segments as they play the game, but their time with the game will never be the same.

The action is also very fast. The characters run on their own so the only way that players can control them is through timing their jumps. Stanley, the photographer, is the easier of the two characters to control. He doesn’t have as many options for movement so it will be easy for even novice characters to pick him up and do well. Sydney, on the other hand, is incredibly difficult to control. I played a few rounds as Stanley and got cocky so I tried to take a turn with her. I paid for it at first because she controls very differently. The biggest difference between the two of them is that she can dash forward after jumping. This might not seem like a big deal, but the added choice mixes things up a bit. That dash can help you get onto far away ledges, but it can also land you in big trouble.

We will, hopefully, be getting our hands on Earthnight later this year. I asked the developers about other consoles and they didn’t have anything to announce at the time. I am hoping that this one finds it sway to as many platforms as possible. It is too pretty not too.

What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

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A Parent’s Guide to Fortnite!

At this point just about every parent in North America (and beyond) has likely heard about the game Fortnite. It has been all the rage in recent months and shows no real sign of slowing down. Kids are even playing Fortnite while they are in classes at school! I’ve had a number of parents reach out to me with questions about the game, how it works, and what they should know about it.

Take a look below for our Parent’s Guide to Fortnite! We included all of the questions parents have asked us and more. Sound off in the comments if you have other questions!

What is Fortnite?

Fortnite is a third person shooter developed and published by Epic games that is taking the world by storm. Many people who think of Fortnite recognize it for its wildly popular Battle Royale mode, but that was actually a recent turn in the game’s development. It was originally developed by Epic games as a third person action game where players spent the day roaming the map gathering materials (and fighting zombies) and then returning to their home base, or fort, and building walls, defenses, etc.

It was originally revealed during the Spike TV Video game awards in 2011 and Epic has been slowly developing it ever since.

What is Fortnite: Battle Royale?

Fortnite: Battle Royale is a free-to-play game mode that uses airbus to drop one hundred players onto an island map that is surrounded by an encroaching storm. Players are tasked with gathering weapons, gear, and other equipment and forced to fight each other. The last player standing is the winner.

The game forces interaction between players in a few ways. First, the map is only so big and the resources aren’t infinite. This forces players into conflict immediately. As the match continues the storm will actually close in on the island and take out anyone caught in it. This constantly shrinks the battlefield and forces players to fight as opposed to playing the waiting game on the far corners of the map. Many players liken the game to the Hunger Games franchise.

It is far and away the most popular way to play Fortnite. It has been a smash hit almost from the minute the game mode launched. Its massive popularity has led to it being featured on shows like Good Morning America and the Today Show. Its also a huge hit with gamers who enjoy watching players stream games on services like YouTube and Twitch. It was only just recently that the Twitch Streamer Ninja set a new record for Twitch streams by having over a half million viewers when he was playing Fortnite: Battle Royale with the rapper Drake.

What is the Fortnite Save the World Mode about?

Fortnite’s Save the World mode is what remains from the originally announced version of the game.

Fortnite is set on modern-day Earth. The story is that a worldwide storm appeared suddenly and caused 98% of the world’s population to disappear. They were replaced by zombie-like creatures that constantly attack the remaining population.

Epic Games has said that they view the Save the World mode as a cross between the building game Minecraft and the cooperative shooter Left 4 Dead. Fortnite has groups of up to four players cooperate on varied missions on randomly generated maps. They collect resources, build fortifications, protect survivors, and build weapons and traps to fight waves of creatures.

Players earn rewards for each mission they complete. They can use their rewards to improve their character by giving them new weapons, traps, etc that they can build so they can take on more difficult missions.

How much does Fortnite cost?


Fortnite’s Save the World mode is part of a premium package that costs $39.99, although there is a deluxe version that includes additional content for $59.99. Epic Games has indicated that they will be releasing it as a free-to-play game sometime in 2018 though.

Fortnite: Battle Royale is a free-to-play game. As such, it does include in-game purchases. Players can buy a virtual currency in the game that they can spend on cosmetic skins, emotes, and dances that they can use to express themselves and their personality in the game. These purchases have no impact on the game itself though. There is no way to spend money in Fortnite to give yourself an advantage.

Can our kids play Fortnite with strangers?

Yes.

Both the Save the World and Battle Royale modes allow for random multiplayer games that include strangers.

The Save the World game mode lets players group up with up to four other players. They can choose to invite their friends to play with them or group up with random other players.

The Battle Royale game mode is built around a group of a hundred players competing to be the last player standing. Players can play solo or with a squad of two or four players. The squads don’t have to include friends, though. Instead, you can choose to randomly queue in squads with strangers.

This is going to end up being a big deal for parents who are concerned about the outside world having access to their children online. It is pretty hard to avoid without some very serious discussions about only grouping up with friends. I do recommend using the parental control settings on your console, PC, or Mac to disable the voice chat. This will go a long way to limiting the lines of communication.

Where can you play it?

Fortnite is currently available on PC, Mac, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. The Battle Royale mode is also available on mobile devices (iOS and an Android version is on the way).

There is a growing movement calling for Fortnite to be brought to the Nintendo Switch, but there has been no confirmation as of the date that this guide was written.

How is Fortnite rated by the ESRB?

Fortnite is rated T for teen.

Content Descriptors: Violence

Other: Online Interactions Not Rated by the ESRB (Windows PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One)
 This is an action game in which players build forts, gather resources, craft weapons, and battle hordes of monsters in frenetic combat. From a third-person perspective, players use guns, swords, and grenades to fight skeleton-like monsters (husks) in ranged and melee-style combat. Players can also defeat enemies by using various traps (e.g., electric, spikes, poisonous gas). Battles are highlighted by frequent gunfire, explosions, and cries of pain.

A PSA for Parents about Fortnite and School

 


What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

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Swords of Ditto

Onebitbeyond has got a hit on their hands folks. I got my hands on their upcoming action adventure game, The Swords of Ditto, while I was at PAX East 2018 and I immediately fell in love. I was hungry for more as soon as my demo ended. Thankfully I knew I didn’t need to wait very long because I knew it would be launching on April 24th on PC and PS4.

The Swords of Ditto is an action RPG that is heavily inspired by games like The Legend of Zelda. Players control a child who has been anointed as a “Sword” as they go on a quest to grow in power over the course of four days and, ultimately, do battle with an evil wizard named Mormo. The battle repeats itself every 100 years because of a curse. This is the perfect justification for the rogue like elements in the game. Each time you die (or defeat Mormo) the island resets. The map is scrambled when this happens and it will either descend further into darkness if you failed your last mission or be restored if you won.

One thing is for sure, The Swords of Ditto is not a game that takes itself too seriously. It is animated in a beautifully drawn cartoon art style and is full of gags and references. You see, Swords takes place in the fare future after our civilization has fallen. This newly developed culture has found our lost toys and reveres them as mighty, magical weapons. The weapons that you can purchase at the Toy Shop (No. I’m not kidding.) are different every time, but include things like yo-yo’s, NERF style dart guns, and even a Power Ranger suit. The weapon variety helps to mix things up on each play through and goes a long way for making sure that the game play doesn’t get stale.

The goal is to kill the evil wizard at the end, but that isn’t very easy to do without powering up. Players can do this by leveling up by fighting enemies throughout the world, exploring dungeons for treasures to help power themselves up, finding and money to buy better gear. Time is limited though. There is a day/night cycle that passes while you play and you only have 4 days to prepare for the final battle. This means that you cant spend all of your time chopping down grass looking for coins when there is experience to  be earned. I found that the passage of time created a tension that propelled me forward and forced me into fights that I might have pushed aside for a while if I weren’t in a crunch.

Another feature that I would be remiss if I ignored is the multiplayer. This is a fun game to play with friends. The game doesn’t change much. Two kids appear to become Swords instead of just one and the adventure proceeds as normal. Players are tethered on the same screen with each other which does limit the amount of multitasking that you can do, but it does make the combat very satisfying. My favorite part of the multiplayer mode is the revive mechanic; it is just too cute. When one player falls in combat the other player can move over to their fallen comrade and give them a hug. This divides the survivor’s life total between the two players so they can work together. I particularly enjoyed watching my sons play together They knew that they could revive each other if things went south, but they knew that it wasn’t free so neither of them was reckless. It forced them to learn how to play better faster.

Family Gaming Assessment

The Swords of Ditto is rated E 10+ by the ESRB for “Fantasy Violence.”

PEGI (the rating system used in Europe)  has rated the game PEGI 7 for minor “non-realistic violence against human like and fantastical characters.”

I agree with both of those rating assessments. The combat in this game is more cartoon-ish and comical than it is brutal. Most parents should feel comfortable letting their children play this game or watch it played with little issue.

If you are someone who does take exception to even minor violence in a game, then this may be one to avoid. take a look at the game play trailer below for an idea of how the game plays.

Playability Assessment

The Swords of Ditto is a challenging game. There is no hiding behind that. You will die and you will die often. Kids (or anyone for that matter) who are easily frustrated should give this game a second thought before trying it. I feel like this game is good enough to overcome some of those frustrations, but it is hard to know without taking your child into consideration.

Most of the story in the game is delivered through text so this isn’t a very accessible game for poor readers. There isn’t so much text that an older sibling or parent couldn’t read it out loud to earlier readers though.

Conclusion

This is a wonderful game that would make an excellent choice for anyone looking for a challenging game to play. This is especially true for anyone looking for a game to play side by side on the couch with.

It is currently available for PS4 and PC. They haven’t announced any other consoles yet, but that could change at any time.

What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

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PAX East 2018: The Messenger From Sabotage Studio Delivers

I played a lot of games at PAX East 2018, but none of them captivated me like The Messenger from Sabotage Studio did. We live in a world where everything old has been remade, revisited, remastered, and repackaged for years. You’ll never see me complain about this. Some of my favorite games of the last several years have been born from the hearts and minds of my generational peers remembering the games we loved and putting their own spin on it.

Simply put… The Messenger is a modern response to the Ninja Gaiden series from the NES era. Sabotage Studio is a team full of people who love that game and have gone out of their way to show their reverence in game form.

They have put their love for Ryu Hyabusa’s first adventure on display with this game. With that said, I didn’t just fall head over heels for some random ninja game. This has all the makings of a classic if my demo is any indication. With that said, there are three things that really stood out for me in my short time with the game.

The Controls

I’ve never met a ninja, so I could be making broad and baseless assumptions. But, I’m willing to bet that most of them are pretty quick. I doubt I’m alone there. Ninja games have play fast enough to match that assumption for me. I can’t imagine a slow and plodding combat game like Dark Souls suiting the theme. Fortunately, The Messenger does exactly what it should and more.

I was immediately impressed with the game’s snappy controls. Every button press resulted in immediate action. By the time I was done with my (painfully short) demo I was rewarded with fluid movement and fast action. Nothing felt like it was getting in my way aside from the enemies. It was a great feeling.

There is more to The Messenger than well designed controls though. Sabotage Studio gives us plenty to do. The coolest game mechanic is the “Cloud Step.” The Cloud Step is an extra jump that you can take any time you land an attack on something while jumping. This jump remains charged until you hit the ground. That leads to some very interesting path choices as you get deeper into the game. This combined with a wing suit and time travel portals spread throughout the levels makes for some beautiful runs.

I barely stumbled my way through the demo, but as I did I could imagine the runs that would be put together by skilled players. This is going to be a glory to behind in a few years at an AGDQ event.

The music and sound design

The music was just short of divine. Just listen to the video below to see what I mean. I waited in line for a while to get a chance to play the game. I was VERY grateful that the music was as good as it was.

It was genuinely funny!

I went into my demo expecting an interesting, retro-inspired ninja game. I got that. What I didn’t expect was to find myself laughing in the booth. The overall plot of the game wasn’t particularly funny, but the writing for the supernatural characters like the otherworldly shopkeeper and the demon who brings you back to life should you die were very funny. I can’t wait to see what other funny bits the team is cooking up for us.

 

I went into my demo excited and came out of it hyped out of my mind. Its all I wanted to talk about when I called home to talk to my kids about it. The Messenger will release sometime this summer for PC and Nintendo Switch and I can’t wait to play. What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

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The Adventure Pals logo

The Adventure Pals from Armor Games is an absurd jaunt through a bizarre world where almost nothing makes sense. Turtles can do back flips. Whales complain about “hashtag body shaming.” The hero’s best friend, Sparkles the giraffe, can use his tongue like a propeller to slow their collective fall. The villain wants to turn everyone into hot dog monsters. Every single one of those sentences is true. And here’s one more: This game is just as fun as it is ridiculous.

The premise is simple. Your dad has been kidnapped by the maniacal villain Mr. B, and is at risk of being turned into a hot dog. You, Sparkles the giraffe, and Mr. Rock are his only hope. You need to travel through several diverse and colorful levels full of pirates, cowboys, and other (even weirder) oddities in order to save him. Each new zone has a series of quests that will have you exploring complex platforming levels in search of rubies, cupcakes, and other treasures.

No. Seriously. This pirate is made out of bacon and eggs.

The Adventure Pals may be absurd, but that doesn’t mean it is simple. Eventually you will find yourself wall jumping up a passageway, then hovering with Sparkle’s tongue as you attempt to float closer to an element that you can grapple from, only to ride a zipline afterwards. It can be difficult to chain all of these different moves together, and there are no checkpoints to speak of. I would have quit in frustration if the game didn’t go out of its way to help me. The platforming in The Adventure Pals is forgiving thanks to snappy controls, easily timed wall jumping, and a mechanic that lets you mantle up onto a platform if you mistime a jump. This compensates for some devilishly challenging platforming sections as you progress through the games 105 levels. The mantling mechanic alone saved me dozens of times.

This isn’t just a simple platformer either. The Adventure Pals features a leveling system that lets you choose from up to three different perks each time you gain a level. This added a sense of progression and drove me to defeat every enemy I could find in search of blue experience orbs. The perks were varied and all of them felt useful. I loved the ability to improve my inventory size early. But, I was able to unlock pretty exotic perks later on in the game.

No one needs to play The Adventure Pals alone either. The game features drop-in/drop-out cooperative play. This is a great feature for families that have kids who just can’t make up their minds what they want to play.

Is this a kid friendly game?

The Adventure Pals is rated E 10+ by the ESRB for Fantasy Violence and Crude Humor. It is also rated PEGI 7 by the Pan European Game Information organization.

The Fantasy Violence is negligible in this game. You run around fighting hot dog monsters and oddly shaped blobs with a wooden sword. This will not be an issue for the vast majority of parents.

The Crude Humor is where some folks might have concerns. I played through the game and found it to be on par with the humor found in most cartoons on Cartoon Network, or with older Nickelodeon cartoons like Ren and Stimpy. This isn’t intellectual humor here folks. We’re talking fart jokes and bosses made up of literal bacon and eggs.

Can Kids play it?

The Adventure Pals is a challenging game. Inexperienced gamers won’t be sprinting through this one. As I said above, though, the game’s mechanics are forgiving enough to keep it from getting frustrating. Youngsters looking for a challenging platformer after finishing Super Mario Odyssey will be very happy with this one.

Most of the story is delivered through text so I don’t recommend this game for early readers unless they have a helper nearby. The iconography is ok, but it is still pretty hard to follow what’s going on without being able to reason what is going on.

Conclusion

I loved this game and I think that it is worthy purchase for families looking for a smaller game to play. It will launch on Xbox One, PS4, PC/Mac, and Switch on April 3rd.

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