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Here are all the video game releases rated E-T by the ESRB that are releasing between April 5th and April 11th.

Tuesday, April 7th

  • Disaster Report 4: Summer Memories- PS4, Switch
  • Grimvalor- Switch

Wednesday, April 8th

  • Convoy: A Tactical Roguelike- PS4, Xbox One, Switch
  • Galaxy of Pen and Paper +1 Edition- Xbox One, Switch
  • Pen and Paper Games Bundle- Switch
  • Towertale- Switch
  • Ubongo- Switch

Thursday, April 9th

  • Beholder 2- Xbox One
  • Bridge! 3- Switch
  • Fight of Animals- Switch
  • Gunbrick: Reloaded- Switch
  • Monster Viator- Switch

Friday, April 10th

  • BQM: BlockQuest Maker- Xbox One
  • Braveland Trilogy- Xbox One
  • Final Fantasy VII Remake- PS4
  • Obduction- Xbox One
  • Retro Tanks- Xbox One
  • RMX Real Motocross- Switch

Saturday, April 11th

  • Space Engineers- Xbox One
  • Tharsis- Switch

Jeff’s Pick of the Week

Finally! After almost five years since it was announced, Final Fantasy VII Remake will be in our hands. I cannot wait to dive into Cloud’s story and interact with all of the other characters along the way. I am not a huge fan of the original game and I do not think it aged very well, but I do respect its importance to gaming history. I tried to play the original on Switch last year, but could not get myself to finish it. I only got out of Midgar, which is where this game is going to end. I cannot wait to see the upgraded graphics and what they have included to fill out the story of Cloud, Barret, and Aerith.


What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

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Bubble Bobble was originally released by Taito back in 1986. I still remember renting it and trying to get to the end with my younger brother. Bubble Bobble 4 Friends revisits the core structure of the original while adapting it beautifully to the Switch.

The core gameplay loop is the same as it has always been. You play an adorable dinosaur-monster that bounces around levels blowing bubbles. You can bounce on them OR use those bubbles to capture enemies. The primary difference is that now it earns the 4 in the title by allowing up to four players to play at once.

The levels are plentiful and the challenge curve is great. I loved the early levels that I could share with my daughter without any real trouble. Later levels were a bit much for her, but she still stuck it out to play with her old man.

I really enjoyed what I played of it, but the bulk of that enjoyment was grounded in the past. I felt myself longing for the past as opposed to fully enjoying the present. It just didn’t do enough differently to make me hungry to play it for a long time. That isn’t to say that it is bad. It is well made, and looks wonderful, (Seriously. Screenshots betray its toy-like animation.) but it falls short of greatness because it plays it safe sticking to a tried and true formula.

Can a kid play this game?

Bubble Bobble 4 Friends is not a difficult game to play. Your move set as your adorable dinosaur. You jump, you blow bubbles, and you bounce on top of bubbles to climb onto higher platforms. That’s it. It also is a fully 2D game so you only move left to right.

The feature that makes this game even easier for younger gamers to pick up is the 4-player multiplayer. The game is plenty chaotic, but having more players means there are more people to help catch you when you are about to lose a life.

There is also next to zero reading in this game. Even the youngest of gamers will be able to play without any trouble.

Another feature that needs to be mentioned is the invincibility mechanic that unlocks after you fail a level three times. I’m glad to see that this has been more widely adopted because it is a great tool for allowing younger players explore the mechanics of a game and get some practice in without having to restart over and over.

Should a kid play this game?

This is one of the most wholesome games I have ever seen. I have a difficult time imagining any parent having an issue here. Players defeat enemies by trapping them in bubbles and bouncing into them.

The ESRB has rated Bubble Bobble 4 Friends “E for Everyone. “

This is an action platformer in which players control small dinosaurs through whimsical levels. Players defeat small enemies and bosses by trapping them in bubbles in order to progress. Bubbles often burst, causing enemies to turn into fruit; boss battles show characters getting charred after oversized bombs explode.


ESRB.com

Conclusion

Bubble Bobble 4 Friends won’t win any game of the year awards, but it is a cute blast of nostalgia for fans of the original on NES that lets us play with our kids as opposed to taking turns with them.


What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

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By now you’ve probably seen a lot of information and reviews about Nintendo’s latest Animal Crossing game.  What you may not have seen, however, is a detailed description of the game experience from the perspective of a secondary player on a shared island. Read below for more information on our experiences with island sharing.

As you may already know, the Engaged Family Gaming household has 3 Switch consoles.  When Animal Crossing: New Horizons came out, we purchased 3 copies of the game, just in time to be stuck at home for an undetermined amount of time.  What we did not expect was that 3 consoles and 3 copies of the game would not be enough for all 5 of us to have an enjoyable Animal Crossing experience.

In Animal Crossing: New Horizons, players travel to a deserted island and spend their time creating various homes, shops, museums, gardens, etc.  Players collect goods around the island and turn them in for rewards that enable them to create more beautiful and enticing properties on their islands.  These properties encourage other animals to come join you on your island. Overall this is supposed to be a relaxing and peaceful experience where you try to build your own perfect escape.  The limitation is that you can only have one island per console and any other players joining this “multiplayer” experience must share the island. This works really well if you are the first player on the island.  Unfortunately, it doesn’t work as well for the other players sharing the island with the first player.

We originally intended for our Editor in Chief to join our youngest on a shared island.  We thought that if Mom wanted to play too, she could share one of the boys’ islands. This did not go as planned.  First, our youngest wanted Mommy to play with her. In a normal situation that would have been fine, because Mom is not known for spending a lot of time playing video games.  However, recent events had Mom looking for an escape from reality, so she decided to join the little one and devote significant time to playing. She let the little one create and name the island and do the initial setup. She then joined as the island’s Very First Relocator.  On the first day while Mom was learning the game, everything went fine. The littlest played until she was bored. She collected butterflies, caught some fish, and gathered shells from the beaches. When she was done, Mom signed on and explored the island and learned how to shake trees, collect fruit, etc.  Then Mom asked for a fishing pole. She couldn’t get one because the littlest didn’t unlock it yet. This became a problem going forward. We learned that all progression in the game is driven by the main player. The secondary player can’t help, build, or contribute to any of the community buildings. The second player can’t donate items for the museum until the first player does quests to unlock construction and gets the museum built.  The secondary player gets minimal tutorials. The fruit eating mechanic is never explained to the secondary player and the secondary player can only buy DIY patterns from Nook shopping or through the store once the first player has received or unlocked them during quests. Some items needed for building new homes never become available to the secondary player, though they may be earned as gifts or through island mechanics. This quickly became a point of frustration for our household.  So much so that our Editor in Chief has decided not to play at all because he does not want to be a secondary player. This may be because our littlest lacks focus and loves to run around in the game doing completely random quests without many objectives, but it seems to be a concern for many people we’ve heard feedback from.

These complaints don’t even take into account some of the other frustrations that can happen when siblings or players don’t agree and purposefully sabotage or troll each other.  One way to mitigate this would be to have a parent or the most motivated player be the initial island creator. This would help to ease some of the growing pains associated with the ‘gated’ growth in the game.

Since this was so frustrating, we tried playing together in local co-op.  This was even worse. In this mode, you designate a leader and the rest become followers. You can switch between leader and follower at will.  There are many problems with this mode. Since local co-op uses a shared screen, others follow you into whatever buildings you enter, and players can’t get separated.  If you get too far away from each other, the follower gets teleported to the leader. Without a split screen, this severely limits everyone’s ability to play. Using the joy con in this mode is very complicated. The follower has no access to their inventory or tool wheel.  A single button pressed over and over gives you access to your tools. Items you gather are placed in the recycle box in Tom Nook’s tent or building. Any time the leader opens a menu, any activity the followers may be doing gets paused.

We haven’t had any time to try out the online multiplayer mode, but we’ve heard great things.  The shared experience in this game mode supposedly becomes less frustrating and more hilarious.  We will let you know more about those experiences in a future article.

Overall, this is a beautiful and relaxing game, but if you really want the full Animal Crossing experience, it is best for each player to have their own console and copy of the game.  We realize that this is likely not feasible for everyone so keep these issues in mind if you are considering this game for a single console household with multiple players. This game really feels like it is designed as a single player game with a demo mode for secondary players.


What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

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Animal Crossing New Horizons was released on March 20 2020, and it was perfect timing with all of the stuff going on. I have played many, many hours and so have my brother and sister. Here is my opinion: The game is really good. The graphics are great, the gameplay loop is fun, and honestly we all need an escape from the real world. Animal Crossing provides that. 

The game is simple: you move to a deserted island with two other animals and you live together. You decorate your home and the island with cosmetic items that you craft with the resources that regenerate daily. 

While doing that you also pay off your debt to Tom Nook, expand your home, and just live a happy life with your neighbors. That is literally the game. 

Now.. that sounds like it would get boring, but the game has this nifty feature that gives you what are, essentially, quests to do that make it so you keep playing.  They aren’t lame either. They feel rewarding to do. 

It rewards you for picking the weeds and gathering materials.  There is a rock that literally gives you money somewhere on your island! Why wouldn’t you want to play every day. 

Animal Crossing: New Horizons encourages appointment gaming, where you stop by once a day to gather resources and check the shop. It rewards you for picking the weeds and gathering materials every day.  There is even a rock that literally GIVES you money somewhere on your island every day. Why wouldn’t you want to come back? 

Animal Crossing: New Horizons also has a multiplayer mode where you visit your friends islands and they visit yours. This experience is honestly one of my favorite parts. I love going to my brother and sister’s islands and helping them make money or sharing cool new crafting recipes.

Can a kid play it? 

Yes most definitely. The game is simple, there are no moments that are difficult, there are no complicated button presses to pull off a jump and or anything like that. You just walk around, pick things up, and sell them. 

There is a little reading involved, but if they are not able to read then the parts of the game that they will be playing, running around the island and picking stuff up, don’t involve reading.

Should a kid play it? 

Animal Crossing: New Horizons is rated E for Everyone by the ESRB.

This is a simulation game in which players explore a deserted island, interact with animals, and engage in various activities (e.g., fishing, bug catching, fossil hunting). Some bugs can sting players, causing them to become dizzy and collapse. Players can bonk characters on the head and/or push them into holes. One character is seen with mucus dripping from his nose; the dialogue also contains comical references (e.g., “Whoever smelt it dealt it.”).

ESRB.com

Should you buy it? 

Yes and no. It depends on your family. 

If you are an adult buying the game for yourself and a young child then yes! This is a great game to share! You should make sure that the adult (or whoever is most game savvy) boots the game up first though. This way they become the main player on the island and aren’t held back by the other player. 

If you live in a household with more than one Switch, then we definitely recommend buying a copy for each Switch. Each Switch will have separate islands and there will be no issues sharing resources. The different players in the house will be able to play multiplayer together. 

However, if you are buying the game for two kids that are around the same age and gaming ability who also share a Switch, then you may want to think about it. Each Switch only has one island, and this can lead to frustration. The first person to play the game and name the island is the Island Representative, and is the only person who can do some of the quests and activities. You’ll definitely want to have a plan for how they will share the island. 

Conclusion

All in all Animal Crossing: New Horizons is amazing. Anyone can play it, there is no inappropriate content, and the game is just fun. Even though there are some issues with players who join after the game has started being able to make decisions about the island and all that, the game is great!


What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

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Here are all the video game releases rated E-T by the ESRB that are releasing between March 29th and April 3rd.

Monday, March 30th

  • What the Box?- Switch

Tuesday, March 31st

  • Bubble Bobble 4 Friends- Switch
  • Chapeau- Switch
  • Cooking Mama: Cookstar- Switch
  • Creature in the Well- PS4
  • Operencia: The Stolen Sun- PS4, Switch
  • Stones of the Revenant- Switch
  • Treachery in Beatdown City- Switch
  • Ty the Tasmanian Tiger HD- Switch

Wednesday, April 1st

  • Lost Artifacts: Golden Island- Xbox One
  • Totally Reliable Delivery Service- PS4, Xbox One, Switch
  • Wurroom- Switch

Thursday, April 2nd

  • Curious Expedition- PS4, Xbox One, Switch
  • Lost Artifacts- Switch
  • MazM: Jekyll and Hyde- Switch
  • MetaChampions- Switch
  • Pocket Harvest- Switch
  • Rascall Fight- Switch
  • Snakeybus- Switch
  • The Otterman Empire- Switch

Friday, April 3rd

  • Coral Nintendo Switch Lite
  • Drift Zone Arcade- Switch
  • HyperParasite- PS4, Xbox One, Switch
  • In Other Waters- Switch

For the Grown-Ups

  • Persona 5 Royal- PS4 (Tuesday, March 31st)
  • Resident Evil 3- PS4, Xbox One, PC (Friday, April 3rd)
  • Resident Evil: Resistance- PS4, Xbox One, PC (Friday, April 3rd)

Jeff’s Pick of the Week

My pick of the week has to go to Bubble Bobble 4 Friends. I love the original NES version of Bubble Bobble. I cannot wait to hear all of the newly created music that will go along with this game. I am ready to join Bub and Bob (and their 2 new friends) on the Rainbow Islands. It has been too long since a game has been released for this series.


What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

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Here are all the video game releases rated E-T by the ESRB that are releasing between March 22nd and March 28th.

Monday, March 23rd

  • Bug Academy- Switch
  • Rhythm of the Gods- Switch

Tuesday, March 24th

  • Bleeding Edge- Xbox One, PC
  • Deep Sky Derelicts: Definitive Edition- PS4, Xbox One, Switch
  • Hyperspace Delivery Service- Switch
  • Wartile- PS4, Xbox One

Thursday, March 26th

  • Ara Fell: Enhanced Edition- PS4, Xbox One
  • DreamGallery- Switch
  • Grand Guilds- Switch
  • Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3: Fantastic Four DLC- Switch
  • Mekorama- Xbox One, Switch
  • NecroWorm- Switch
  • One Step from Eden- Switch
  • Sin Slayers- Switch

Friday, March 27th

  • Children of Zodiarcs- PS4, Xbox One, Switch
  • Gigantosaurus: The Game- PS4, Xbox One, Switch
  • Inops- Xbox One
  • One Piece: Pirate Warriors 4- PS4, Xbox One, Switch
  • Railway Empire- Switch
  • Repressed- Switch

For the Grown-Ups

  • Half-Life: Alyx- PC (Monday, March 23rd)
  • Control: The Foundation DLC- PS4, Xbox One, PC (Thursday, March 26th)

Jeff’s Pick of the Week

This week is difficult to pick. There are not a lot of big family-friendly games coming out. My pick is going to go to Gigantasaurus: The Game. Since we are all spending more time inside currently, this will be the perfect game for your younger kids to play and you can play right alongside them since it allows up to 4-players. This is an especially great game if your child watches the Disney Jr show it is based on.


What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

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Here are all the video game releases rated E-T by the ESRB that are releasing between March 15th and March 21st.

Monday, March 16

  • Deep Diving Adventures- Switch

Tuesday, March 17

  • Covert- PS4
  • Explosive Jake- Xbox One, Switch
  • Kingdom Hearts: All-in-One Package- PS4
  • LA-Mulana- Switch
  • LA-Mulana 2- Switch
  • LA-Mulana 1 and 2: Hidden Treasures Edition- PS4, Xbox One, Switch
  • MLB The Show 20- PS4
  • Overpass- PS4, Xbox One, Switch
  • R.B.I. Baseball 20- PS4, Xbox One, Switch
  • Shenmue III: Big Merry Cruise- PS4

Wednesday, March 18

  • Deemo Reborn: Egoist Special Selection- PS4

Thursday, March 19

  • Beyond Enemy Lines: Essentials- Switch
  • Dezatopia- Switch
  • Factotum 90- Switch
  • SeaBed- Switch
  • Silent World- Switch
  • TT Isle of Man Ride on the Edge 2- Xbox One

Friday, March 20

For the Grown-Ups

  • Doom 64- PS4, Xbox One, PC, Switch (Friday, March 20th)
  • Doom Eternal- PS4, Xbox One, PC (Friday, March 20th)

Jeff’s Pick of the Week

My pick of the week will have to go to Animal Crossing. It has been over seven years since Animal Crossing: New Leaf was released and even longer since Animal Crossing has been able to be played on a home console. I cannot wait to talk to Tom Nook on the island and start my vacation!

Stephen’s Pick of the Week

I could go the easy rout and pick Animal Çrossing: New Horizons, but I want to shine a light on MLB: The Show 20. This is the premiere baseball simulation and could be the only professional Baseball action we see for a while.

What do you think? Are you picking up any of these games? Let us know in the comments!

Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

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Every week the EFG staff will be defining a gaming term that is either confusing or ill-defined. Please leave a comment with any terms you are confused by and we will try to include them in future editions!


The gaming definition this week is a term that is applicable to both video games and board games: Polyomino.

A Polyomino is a geometric shape made up of a group of equal squares touching on their edges.

These shapes are very important to the game design world because of all the different ways that they can be pieced together into a bigger puzzle.

The best, and most popular, example is Tetris. In Tetris, five different polyominoes that each contain four equal squares (called tetrominoes) fall from the top of the screen. Players are tasked with interlocking them at the bottom of the screen with as few holes as possible. Any complete rows that the player creates are cleared from the board as a reward.

The shapes in Tetris even have names. There was a meme that flew around in the last year or so that came just short of personifying them, but their names are straightforward.

  • Square
  • L
  • Skew
  • T
  • Straight

Polyominoes are also quite popular in the board game space. Part of this is because their shapes make great plastic and cardboard components. Their flat surfaces are also a great place to showcase interesting artwork or bright colors. The design reason is simple. The number of different available shapes is relatively small (especially if they are all made of a smaller number of equal squares), and the number of ways that they can be interlocked is vast. This leads to wide variety in game play situations.

Suggested Activities

Polyominoes are a great learning tool and there are all sorts of activities on the web that you can do with your kids.

What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

You can also look at our other video game definitions from previous weeks here!

Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

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Shovel Knight was already one of our favorite games of the last decade.

The Shovel Knight Treasure Trove is one of the best values in games today.

Shovel Knight Dig is coming in the next year or so to provide even MORE Shovel Knight platforming excitement.

Yacht Club announced even MORE Shovel Knight today during their Yacht Club Games presents presentation ahead of PAX East 2020. Their announcement? The adorable block dropping puzzle adventure Shovel Knight Pocket Dungeon.

Shovel Knight Pocket Dungeon follows the adventures of Shovel Knight as he is led on a quest by the mysterious new character Puzzle Knight!

Pocket Dungeon is a block dropping puzzle game so objects like keys, treasure chests, potions, and other objects fall from the top of the screen. While this is happening players slide Shovel Knight around the playing field picking up items and attacking monsters.

The puzzle element really shines in the combat. When Shovel Knight bumps into an enemy they each lose a life point, but if like types of enemies are adjacent to each other, then all of the enemies in that clump take a point of damage. Every step on the playing field ends up being a careful dance as you have to take out groups of enemies in between pickup potions to restore health using potions.

The is a bold new direction for Shovel Knight, but I’m pretty excited about the little bit we’ve seen so far.

What about you? What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

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There is one universal truth regarding video games. It’s true whether you play on Xbox One, PC, Nintendo Switch, or even old school consoles. You need a place to sit while you are playing.

I have been struggling with this problem for years. I like to sit closer to my television while playing (much to my wife’s chagrin) and I have tried all sorts of ways to do that. I’ve moved furniture. I’ve bought folding chairs. I have even resorted to sitting on the edge of my coffee table for short matches (trust me when I say that I ALWAYS regretted that decision).

Up until recently, the EFG office hasn’t been anywhere near my primary gaming area so using my office chair wasn’t really feasible. I DID start to use my desk chair… but it turns out that it was old, busted, and ready to fall apart. I was sad, and at one point repaired it with duct tape. That was all until E-wins came long.

We got our chair in red, too!

Putting It Together

We received their Knight racing chair partially unassembled, and in a giant cardboard box. (My daughter told me to thank them for the cool toy. She loved her spaceship.) It included relatively clear instructions, all of the requirement components and a pair of disposable gloves. Some of the pieces are pre-greased during assembly so the gloves helped keep my hands clean.

All in all, assembly was quick and painless.My older son helped where he could (He was helpful in balancing it a few times), but I would have been able to assemble it on my own without any real trouble. Frankly, anyone with any experience putting together a shelf or two from Ikea will have no problems.

Note: The only part that you NEED to be careful with is to make sure that you assemble the seat and hardware below it in the correct orientation.

The Chair Itself

The E-Win Racing Chair we received from from their Knight Series of Ergonomic Gaming chairs. This is a budget gaming chair with an MSRP of $289. This is a great value for a quality gaming chair.

Everyone in the home office has a different opinion. I’ll skip the boring trope of just listing them all out for the sake of being concise.

The Good

All of us appreciate the level of customization the chair offers. We vary in size from a spry seven year old to a 6 foot tall man who could probably afford to lose a few pounds. All of us are able to sit in the chair and adjust it to feel like our heads, necks, and backs are well supported.

We also found that this was a great chair for families that share equipment to use. This is because there are enough controls to adjust its position for comfort, but not enough that we need to reconfigure a dozen dials for each person.

The Bad

The only real complaint comes from my wife. She prefers her seats to have more cushion and the Knight chair is more firm than she is used to.

Conclusion

We’ve had this chair for a few weeks at this point and we are very happy with it. We’ve played on folding chairs, bean bags, couches, and even coffee tables. We’ll never play without a gaming chair at this point and I can’t imagine why we would choose anything other than an E-Win chair at this point. The product has been incredible.

If you want one for yourself you should head right on over to their website and pick one up!


What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

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FCC Disclosure: An E-wins Knight Ergonomic Gaming Chair was provided to us gratis for the purposes of review.

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