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Bubble Bobble was originally released by Taito back in 1986. I still remember renting it and trying to get to the end with my younger brother. Bubble Bobble 4 Friends revisits the core structure of the original while adapting it beautifully to the Switch.

The core gameplay loop is the same as it has always been. You play an adorable dinosaur-monster that bounces around levels blowing bubbles. You can bounce on them OR use those bubbles to capture enemies. The primary difference is that now it earns the 4 in the title by allowing up to four players to play at once.

The levels are plentiful and the challenge curve is great. I loved the early levels that I could share with my daughter without any real trouble. Later levels were a bit much for her, but she still stuck it out to play with her old man.

I really enjoyed what I played of it, but the bulk of that enjoyment was grounded in the past. I felt myself longing for the past as opposed to fully enjoying the present. It just didn’t do enough differently to make me hungry to play it for a long time. That isn’t to say that it is bad. It is well made, and looks wonderful, (Seriously. Screenshots betray its toy-like animation.) but it falls short of greatness because it plays it safe sticking to a tried and true formula.

Can a kid play this game?

Bubble Bobble 4 Friends is not a difficult game to play. Your move set as your adorable dinosaur. You jump, you blow bubbles, and you bounce on top of bubbles to climb onto higher platforms. That’s it. It also is a fully 2D game so you only move left to right.

The feature that makes this game even easier for younger gamers to pick up is the 4-player multiplayer. The game is plenty chaotic, but having more players means there are more people to help catch you when you are about to lose a life.

There is also next to zero reading in this game. Even the youngest of gamers will be able to play without any trouble.

Another feature that needs to be mentioned is the invincibility mechanic that unlocks after you fail a level three times. I’m glad to see that this has been more widely adopted because it is a great tool for allowing younger players explore the mechanics of a game and get some practice in without having to restart over and over.

Should a kid play this game?

This is one of the most wholesome games I have ever seen. I have a difficult time imagining any parent having an issue here. Players defeat enemies by trapping them in bubbles and bouncing into them.

The ESRB has rated Bubble Bobble 4 Friends “E for Everyone. “

This is an action platformer in which players control small dinosaurs through whimsical levels. Players defeat small enemies and bosses by trapping them in bubbles in order to progress. Bubbles often burst, causing enemies to turn into fruit; boss battles show characters getting charred after oversized bombs explode.


ESRB.com

Conclusion

Bubble Bobble 4 Friends won’t win any game of the year awards, but it is a cute blast of nostalgia for fans of the original on NES that lets us play with our kids as opposed to taking turns with them.


What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

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Animal Crossing: New Horizons is one of the biggest games of the year. LOTS of families are picking it up and it can be hard to figure out what to do next sometimes. The EFG staff has pooled our collective knowledge and put together a list of tips for new players. Take a look below (and comment if you think we should include something)!

You can also check out our multiplayer explanation and a story about sharing an island.

The Basics

  • Weeds grow on your island every morning. It can be tedious, but make sure that you pick them every day. They can be used for lots of useful things like:
    • Hay beds. 20 Clumps of weeds = one Hay bed that you can sell for 400 bells. 
    • Medicine (Weeds and a Wasp Nest)
    • Various crafting recipes
  • You can shake trees and gather the fruit that drops. You can then sell that fruit to Timmy and Tommy. Be aware that sometimes shaking trees will drop a beehive or a wasp nest. Be ready to run away (or catch them with a new!)
  • Make sure to go to the beach every day to gather shells and bottles. You can sell the shells to Timmy and Tommy. The bottles contain DIY recipes. 
  • More resource gathering becomes available after you craft your tools.  You can use your net to catch bugs, your fishing pole to catch fish, and your shovel to hit rocks and to dig up fossils. 
  • Make sure you are grabbing branches when you see them. They are very important for making simple tools (and replacing broken ones). All of your simple tools aside from the vaulting pole and ladder will break over time.  
  • Make sure you are grabbing branches when you see them. They are very important for making simple tools (and replacing broken ones). All of your simple tools aside from the vaulting pole and ladder will break over time.  
  • Try to make one of every recipe you have access to. This will help complete Nook Miles tickets. 
  • The first thing to spend your Nook Miles on is your initial home/tent loan. After that you should target increased inventory space. Having more room in your bags will make almost every part of Animal Crossing better/easier. 
  • You can hit rocks with an axe or a shovel. Hitting rocks will give you clay, iron nuggets, and sometimes gold. There is even a rock on the island every day that will give you bells. If you dig holes behind you when you hit the rocks, then you won’t be knocked back and it will help you get the resources faster. Nuggets and clay are important to craft DIY items and advanced tools.

Advanced Tips


  • Visit your friends and have them visit you! This is a great way to share resources and earn Nook Miles and bells. 
  • The first “loan” you have to pay off in Animal Crossing is paid back in Nook Miles. This forces you to participate in a wide range of different activities. You need to earn 5000 Nook Miles to pay it off the first time. After that the loans will be paid in bells (like in previous games). 
  • You unlock “Nook Miles+” after you pay off your first loan.  These are relatively small tasks/challengers compared to regular Nook Miles challenges. They are replaced upon completion so you can grind them for rewards if you need to. They also give you some sense of direction when you are overwhelmed with different activities. 
  • Talk to EVERYONE. Talking to your villagers every day will help you earn NOOK miles over time. They may even give you items like DIY recipes, clothing, or decorations. 
  • Visit the NOOK ATM every day.  Visiting the NOOK ATM every day will help you earn NOOK miles over time. 

Tips for Remote Island Tours


  • Prepare yourself before you go to a remote island using a Nook Ticket. Be sure to empty your inventory except for:
    • Vaulting pole
    • Shovel
    • Net
    • Fishing pole
    • Axe
  • Remote islands don’t belong to other players so it is alright to take all of the resources. So make sure you take everything that you can to make the most of your Nook Ticket (They’re expensive). You will also NEVER return to the same island twice. 
  • Keep in mind that you can craft replacement items for flimsy tools you break. 
  • If the remote island has trees that you do not have, then eat the fruit you have found on the island and use your shovel to dig the tree up. You can then plant that tree on your island. This will help you earn bells and Nook Miles.

What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know if we missed anything!

Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

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By now you’ve probably seen a lot of information and reviews about Nintendo’s latest Animal Crossing game.  What you may not have seen, however, is a detailed description of the game experience from the perspective of a secondary player on a shared island. Read below for more information on our experiences with island sharing.

As you may already know, the Engaged Family Gaming household has 3 Switch consoles.  When Animal Crossing: New Horizons came out, we purchased 3 copies of the game, just in time to be stuck at home for an undetermined amount of time.  What we did not expect was that 3 consoles and 3 copies of the game would not be enough for all 5 of us to have an enjoyable Animal Crossing experience.

In Animal Crossing: New Horizons, players travel to a deserted island and spend their time creating various homes, shops, museums, gardens, etc.  Players collect goods around the island and turn them in for rewards that enable them to create more beautiful and enticing properties on their islands.  These properties encourage other animals to come join you on your island. Overall this is supposed to be a relaxing and peaceful experience where you try to build your own perfect escape.  The limitation is that you can only have one island per console and any other players joining this “multiplayer” experience must share the island. This works really well if you are the first player on the island.  Unfortunately, it doesn’t work as well for the other players sharing the island with the first player.

We originally intended for our Editor in Chief to join our youngest on a shared island.  We thought that if Mom wanted to play too, she could share one of the boys’ islands. This did not go as planned.  First, our youngest wanted Mommy to play with her. In a normal situation that would have been fine, because Mom is not known for spending a lot of time playing video games.  However, recent events had Mom looking for an escape from reality, so she decided to join the little one and devote significant time to playing. She let the little one create and name the island and do the initial setup. She then joined as the island’s Very First Relocator.  On the first day while Mom was learning the game, everything went fine. The littlest played until she was bored. She collected butterflies, caught some fish, and gathered shells from the beaches. When she was done, Mom signed on and explored the island and learned how to shake trees, collect fruit, etc.  Then Mom asked for a fishing pole. She couldn’t get one because the littlest didn’t unlock it yet. This became a problem going forward. We learned that all progression in the game is driven by the main player. The secondary player can’t help, build, or contribute to any of the community buildings. The second player can’t donate items for the museum until the first player does quests to unlock construction and gets the museum built.  The secondary player gets minimal tutorials. The fruit eating mechanic is never explained to the secondary player and the secondary player can only buy DIY patterns from Nook shopping or through the store once the first player has received or unlocked them during quests. Some items needed for building new homes never become available to the secondary player, though they may be earned as gifts or through island mechanics. This quickly became a point of frustration for our household.  So much so that our Editor in Chief has decided not to play at all because he does not want to be a secondary player. This may be because our littlest lacks focus and loves to run around in the game doing completely random quests without many objectives, but it seems to be a concern for many people we’ve heard feedback from.

These complaints don’t even take into account some of the other frustrations that can happen when siblings or players don’t agree and purposefully sabotage or troll each other.  One way to mitigate this would be to have a parent or the most motivated player be the initial island creator. This would help to ease some of the growing pains associated with the ‘gated’ growth in the game.

Since this was so frustrating, we tried playing together in local co-op.  This was even worse. In this mode, you designate a leader and the rest become followers. You can switch between leader and follower at will.  There are many problems with this mode. Since local co-op uses a shared screen, others follow you into whatever buildings you enter, and players can’t get separated.  If you get too far away from each other, the follower gets teleported to the leader. Without a split screen, this severely limits everyone’s ability to play. Using the joy con in this mode is very complicated. The follower has no access to their inventory or tool wheel.  A single button pressed over and over gives you access to your tools. Items you gather are placed in the recycle box in Tom Nook’s tent or building. Any time the leader opens a menu, any activity the followers may be doing gets paused.

We haven’t had any time to try out the online multiplayer mode, but we’ve heard great things.  The shared experience in this game mode supposedly becomes less frustrating and more hilarious.  We will let you know more about those experiences in a future article.

Overall, this is a beautiful and relaxing game, but if you really want the full Animal Crossing experience, it is best for each player to have their own console and copy of the game.  We realize that this is likely not feasible for everyone so keep these issues in mind if you are considering this game for a single console household with multiple players. This game really feels like it is designed as a single player game with a demo mode for secondary players.


What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

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Animal Crossing New Horizons was released on March 20 2020, and it was perfect timing with all of the stuff going on. I have played many, many hours and so have my brother and sister. Here is my opinion: The game is really good. The graphics are great, the gameplay loop is fun, and honestly we all need an escape from the real world. Animal Crossing provides that. 

The game is simple: you move to a deserted island with two other animals and you live together. You decorate your home and the island with cosmetic items that you craft with the resources that regenerate daily. 

While doing that you also pay off your debt to Tom Nook, expand your home, and just live a happy life with your neighbors. That is literally the game. 

Now.. that sounds like it would get boring, but the game has this nifty feature that gives you what are, essentially, quests to do that make it so you keep playing.  They aren’t lame either. They feel rewarding to do. 

It rewards you for picking the weeds and gathering materials.  There is a rock that literally gives you money somewhere on your island! Why wouldn’t you want to play every day. 

Animal Crossing: New Horizons encourages appointment gaming, where you stop by once a day to gather resources and check the shop. It rewards you for picking the weeds and gathering materials every day.  There is even a rock that literally GIVES you money somewhere on your island every day. Why wouldn’t you want to come back? 

Animal Crossing: New Horizons also has a multiplayer mode where you visit your friends islands and they visit yours. This experience is honestly one of my favorite parts. I love going to my brother and sister’s islands and helping them make money or sharing cool new crafting recipes.

Can a kid play it? 

Yes most definitely. The game is simple, there are no moments that are difficult, there are no complicated button presses to pull off a jump and or anything like that. You just walk around, pick things up, and sell them. 

There is a little reading involved, but if they are not able to read then the parts of the game that they will be playing, running around the island and picking stuff up, don’t involve reading.

Should a kid play it? 

Animal Crossing: New Horizons is rated E for Everyone by the ESRB.

This is a simulation game in which players explore a deserted island, interact with animals, and engage in various activities (e.g., fishing, bug catching, fossil hunting). Some bugs can sting players, causing them to become dizzy and collapse. Players can bonk characters on the head and/or push them into holes. One character is seen with mucus dripping from his nose; the dialogue also contains comical references (e.g., “Whoever smelt it dealt it.”).

ESRB.com

Should you buy it? 

Yes and no. It depends on your family. 

If you are an adult buying the game for yourself and a young child then yes! This is a great game to share! You should make sure that the adult (or whoever is most game savvy) boots the game up first though. This way they become the main player on the island and aren’t held back by the other player. 

If you live in a household with more than one Switch, then we definitely recommend buying a copy for each Switch. Each Switch will have separate islands and there will be no issues sharing resources. The different players in the house will be able to play multiplayer together. 

However, if you are buying the game for two kids that are around the same age and gaming ability who also share a Switch, then you may want to think about it. Each Switch only has one island, and this can lead to frustration. The first person to play the game and name the island is the Island Representative, and is the only person who can do some of the quests and activities. You’ll definitely want to have a plan for how they will share the island. 

Conclusion

All in all Animal Crossing: New Horizons is amazing. Anyone can play it, there is no inappropriate content, and the game is just fun. Even though there are some issues with players who join after the game has started being able to make decisions about the island and all that, the game is great!


What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

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Here are all the video game releases rated E-T by the ESRB that are releasing between March 29th and April 3rd.

Monday, March 30th

  • What the Box?- Switch

Tuesday, March 31st

  • Bubble Bobble 4 Friends- Switch
  • Chapeau- Switch
  • Cooking Mama: Cookstar- Switch
  • Creature in the Well- PS4
  • Operencia: The Stolen Sun- PS4, Switch
  • Stones of the Revenant- Switch
  • Treachery in Beatdown City- Switch
  • Ty the Tasmanian Tiger HD- Switch

Wednesday, April 1st

  • Lost Artifacts: Golden Island- Xbox One
  • Totally Reliable Delivery Service- PS4, Xbox One, Switch
  • Wurroom- Switch

Thursday, April 2nd

  • Curious Expedition- PS4, Xbox One, Switch
  • Lost Artifacts- Switch
  • MazM: Jekyll and Hyde- Switch
  • MetaChampions- Switch
  • Pocket Harvest- Switch
  • Rascall Fight- Switch
  • Snakeybus- Switch
  • The Otterman Empire- Switch

Friday, April 3rd

  • Coral Nintendo Switch Lite
  • Drift Zone Arcade- Switch
  • HyperParasite- PS4, Xbox One, Switch
  • In Other Waters- Switch

For the Grown-Ups

  • Persona 5 Royal- PS4 (Tuesday, March 31st)
  • Resident Evil 3- PS4, Xbox One, PC (Friday, April 3rd)
  • Resident Evil: Resistance- PS4, Xbox One, PC (Friday, April 3rd)

Jeff’s Pick of the Week

My pick of the week has to go to Bubble Bobble 4 Friends. I love the original NES version of Bubble Bobble. I cannot wait to hear all of the newly created music that will go along with this game. I am ready to join Bub and Bob (and their 2 new friends) on the Rainbow Islands. It has been too long since a game has been released for this series.


What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

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Microsoft is giving away free Minecraft Education content to help with distance learning for kids that are out of school thanks to Covid-19.

Microsoft, the company that owns Minecraft, announced that they have added a new category to the Minecraft Marketplace that includes content meant to help supplement learning on a variety of subjects. The content includes things like a model of the human eye and a very detailed map of Washington DC.

Educators around the world are doing everything they can to provide digital lessons for the half a billion students who are out of school due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This is not an easy task and we want to do our part to help keep young minds sharp and stimulated. 

Microsoft

All of this new content is free to download from the Microsoft Marketplace until June 30, 2020.

What do you think? Are you and your kids going to take advantage? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

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Here are all the video game releases rated E-T by the ESRB that are releasing between March 22nd and March 28th.

Monday, March 23rd

  • Bug Academy- Switch
  • Rhythm of the Gods- Switch

Tuesday, March 24th

  • Bleeding Edge- Xbox One, PC
  • Deep Sky Derelicts: Definitive Edition- PS4, Xbox One, Switch
  • Hyperspace Delivery Service- Switch
  • Wartile- PS4, Xbox One

Thursday, March 26th

  • Ara Fell: Enhanced Edition- PS4, Xbox One
  • DreamGallery- Switch
  • Grand Guilds- Switch
  • Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3: Fantastic Four DLC- Switch
  • Mekorama- Xbox One, Switch
  • NecroWorm- Switch
  • One Step from Eden- Switch
  • Sin Slayers- Switch

Friday, March 27th

  • Children of Zodiarcs- PS4, Xbox One, Switch
  • Gigantosaurus: The Game- PS4, Xbox One, Switch
  • Inops- Xbox One
  • One Piece: Pirate Warriors 4- PS4, Xbox One, Switch
  • Railway Empire- Switch
  • Repressed- Switch

For the Grown-Ups

  • Half-Life: Alyx- PC (Monday, March 23rd)
  • Control: The Foundation DLC- PS4, Xbox One, PC (Thursday, March 26th)

Jeff’s Pick of the Week

This week is difficult to pick. There are not a lot of big family-friendly games coming out. My pick is going to go to Gigantasaurus: The Game. Since we are all spending more time inside currently, this will be the perfect game for your younger kids to play and you can play right alongside them since it allows up to 4-players. This is an especially great game if your child watches the Disney Jr show it is based on.


What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

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Animal Crossing: New Horizons (Check out our review here!) released on March, 20, 2020. One of the features that players are bound to be excited about is the multiplayer. There is just something about teaming up with your your friends and running around a village in Animal Crossing and it looks like New Horizons is going to give players some great options.

There are two different ways to play with other people. Take a look below to see how they work.

One Switch

Each Nintendo Switch can have a single Animal Crossing: New Horizons deserted island. Each account can have a different island resident with their own home. Up to four of those players can play on the island simultaneously (with separate joy-cons and controllers) using the local multiplayer option.

This is accomplished by one of the players starting Animal Crossing, accessing their NookPhone (Using the ZL button) and “calling” the other players who live on the island using the “Call Islander” app.

The player who does the calling is the Leader and everyone else is a follower. The leader controls the camera, and can access menus while the followers have to stay on the same screen as the leader. Likewise, the leader is the only one who can access their pockets. Followers can catch fish, bugs, fruit, and wood but those items end up in the recycle bin near the Resident Services building to retrieve later.

This seems limiting, but it is very easy to change who the leader is using the NookPhone menus.

Up to Eight Switches

Up to eight people can play Animal Crossing: New Horizons using separate Switches. This can be done locally using the Local Play options or Online.

Players access this option by visiting their deserted island’s airport and talking to the Dodo bird. He will give you multiple options for opening up your island to visitors.

All my friends!

If you select the “All My Friends” option, then anyone that you are friends with on the Nintendo Switch that also has a Nintendo Switch online membership will be able to visit your town.

Only my Best Friends

You can designate visiting players as Best Friends using the Best Friends app on your in game Nook Phone. If they are Best Friends, then they CAN use tools like axes and shovels. Be sure to explain this difference to your kids to avoid trolling or innocent accidents.

Once you have people on your Best Friends list you can choose the “Only My Best Friends” option which limits the people who can come to your island to just Best Friends.

Invite via Dodo Code!

The Dodo Code is essentially a password that you set up to let people enter your game that you might not already be friends with on Switch. Anyone who has the Dodo Code can enter the island so you definitely want to make sure that your kids only use it sparingly.

Why Play Online With Other People Anyway?

At first glance, Animal Crossing: New Horizons doesn’t look like an online game. You’re just a cute little person running around a deserted island. But, its definitely not intended to be a purely solo experience.

Playing with other people is helpful for a few reasons beyond just being social and seeing other people’s creations.

  • You and other players can trade decorations, tools, resources, and fruit
  • Each fruit that you plant on your island will help you complete a Nook Miles ticket.

What do you think? Were these descriptions helpful? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

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We’re all going to be stuck indoors for a while, so this is a great opportunity to play one of the MMOs that you have always been meaning to try, but never had the time.

Free to Play MMOs

Some of the best MMOs on the market are free to play right now. Many of them are supported with in-game purchases like cosmetics and experience boosts, but they can be downloaded and played from front to back without spending money. These are a great option if you want to dive in, but don’t have the money to throw down for a new video game right now.

Star Wars: The Old Republic

Star Wars is, obviously, a very big deal right now. The Old Republic is an MMO that has been around for a while (it released in 2011), but it still receives updates and has an active community (nearly 200,000 users a day). The story takes place long before the movies and explores one of the cooler parts of the Star Wars timeline. If you or your kids are big into Star Wars, then this is going to be a good choice.

Star Trek: Online

Star Trek Online has about 100,000 monthly active players and has been around since 2010. This MMO gives you the chance to become your own Star Fleet captain with your own ship to command. There are quests that explore all of the major Star Trek storylines from the shows and the movies and lots of original content, too. Trekkies shouldn’t sleep on this one.

Guild Wars 2

GW2 has a very active user base with almost 350,000 daily users. It has a very immersive story that responds to player choice. It is a fun, high fantasy game with cool interesting races to choose from. You play as a member of a guild of adventurers who are gathering to hold off a group of ancient dragons from destroying the world.

Old School RuneScape

“Old School Runescape” was released in 2013 and has been receiving continuous support since it launched. It started as just being a relaunch of the 2007 version of the game, but its wild success has led to graphics overhauls, and new quality of life improvements. This version of Runescape is even bigger than the original with more than 2 million daily users.

Free (For Now)

Dungeons and Dragons Online

Dungeons and Dragons Online is exactly what the title says it is: an MMO build using the Dungeons and Dragons races, classes, and themes. This is a free to start game that is supported with DLC content packs that includes raids, challenges and dungeons. The developer has announced that, as a result of the Coronavirus pandemic, they are making the game and its content completely free for a limited period of time. The details are listed below:

  • All dungeons and raids, including those in expansion packs, are open to everyone through April 30.
  • The Buddy Bonus 5% XP will be active from March 20 through March 29. This will be in addition to the weekend events.
  • Mimic event will be active starting March 26 through April 6.
  • The anniversary event will be active starting March 26 through April 30.

Lord of the Rings Online

Lord of the Rings Online is an MMO that was originally released in 2007. It is a very lore heavy dive into the world of Lord of the Rings and is a great story to play through if you are a fan of the movies OR the books. It is a free to start game that is supported by DLC packs that include raids, quests, and “skirmishes.” The developer has announced that, as a result of the Coronavirus pandemic, they are making the game and its content completely free for a limited period of time. The details are listed below:

  • All quests, instances, and skirmishes, including those in expansion packs, are open to everyone through April 30.
  • The Curator will be returning starting March 26 through April 30.
  • There will be a 10% virtue XP boost starting on March 26 through April 6.
  • The Baggins’ Birthday event will be available March 26 through April 6.

Exceptions to the Rule

There are a few options out there that are worth mentioning in spite of the fact that they aren’t free.

World of Warcraft

How can I make a list of MMOs without mentioning World of Warcraft? It’s true that WoW has a monthly subscription, but it does have a fun demo. You can play up to level 20 as just about any race and class. This is a great option if you or someone in your family just needs a game to play for a short period of time and has no real intention of continuing the game beyond that.

Final Fantasy XIV

Final Fantasy XIV has become massively popular and is available on PC and PS4. The full version of FFXIV does require a purchase and a monthly subscription, but there is a free trial. The limitations on the trial are:

  • Free Trial Players can create only eight (8) playable characters, restricted to one (1) playable character per world.
  • Free Trial account characters have their level capped at level thirty five (35).
  • Free Trial account characters can obtain only a capped amount of in game currency (GIL).

What do you think? Are you or your kids going to play any of these games? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

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What better way to start a 2-week self-quarantine than with a bit of nostalgia? Growing up I was a HUGE fan of River City Ransom for the NES. I’ve missed a few American localizations of other titles in the series, but River City Girls was one that I really didn’t want to pass by.

Series mainstays, Kunio and Ricky (Alex and Jack in US titles), have been kidnapped and this time it’s up to their girlfriends, Misako and Kyoko, to rescue them. It’s a classic beat’em up with RPG elements such as purchasable items, tons of awesome unlockable moves, and leveling. RCG also has a killer soundtrack and plenty of easter eggs and nods to other old games in the genre tossed in for good measure.

I often found myself grinning at the girls’ antics as they pummel their way through several districts of River City in hopes of finding clues about what happened to their beloved boys. Along the way, they meet all sorts of quirky characters, bosses, and shop keepers. Misako and Kyoko both play a bit differently but are balanced, so playing one or the other purely comes down to preference.

The only downside of the game is the ending. It’s a bit unsatisfying and confusing to anyone who’s not SUPER into the series as a whole (including games not brought over to the US, something that’s only discovered by finding and defeating the game’s secret boss.) What IS nice is that you can play a New Game+, adding Kunio and Riki as playable characters.

If you’re a fan of old-school beat’em ups, River City Girls is certainly worth your attention. It looks great, plays great, and has plenty of nostalgia to keep you coming back for more.

Can Kid’s Play This Game?

The game is rated E10+ for Fantasy Violence, Language, Suggestive Themes, and Mild Blood. Use your best judgment here when it comes to the kids. The core of the game is centered around violence, though the blood only comes into play with some of the animated character portraits after a boss has been beaten to a pulp. The language is very mild, and the suggestive themes are pretty non-existent except for one or two obscure lines of dialogue. 

The Conclusion

River City Girls is available digitally from the Nintendo eShop, PlayStation Store, Xbox Live, Steam, GOG, and Humble Bundle for $29.99.

This review was written by Rob Kalajian, the founder of A Pawn’s Perspective.

A Steam key for River City Girls was provided free for review by WayForward

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