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Linda Wrobel

Slap Down! is a light card collecting game where you are rolling dice to determine to pair to collect, but watch out, all the players are going for the same cards! This game can be played with two to eight players, the only limitation with a larger group is having a surface that allows all the players to reach the cards.

Components

  • 50 cards: 25 pairs of cards with 5 different colors and 5 different shapes in unique combinations
  • 2 Dice: One with the 5 shapes and a “wild” side, One with the 5 colors and a “wild” side.

Gameplay

Set up

To begin, shuffle and randomly spread out the 50 cards face up on the playing area in a grid pattern so they do not overlap. This area is the Slapping Field.

A Turn

The first player is the roller and they begin a turn by trolling the two dice to determine the color and shape. All players then scan the Slapping Field and try to find the matching pair that matches the dice. To claim the cards a player must be the first one to slap, or touch, both cards simultaneously. The player earning the card and places it in front of themself to create their collection. However, the cards collected must remain face up and visible, because they are still in play.

The Theft

As the game progresses a color and shape combination may come up which is no longer in the Slapping Field. When this occurs you can steal from an opponent. To steal, you need to slap the pair in front of your opponent which matches the dice. A player can protect their cards by slapping them first. A Theft cannot occur if there is an option in the Slapping Field.

The Penalty

Near the end of the game as things become more frantic it can be harder to protect your collection. Players may only protect the cards that match the die rolls. If they inadvertently slapped the wrong cards and another player catches them, they have to forfeit those cards to the player that caught them.

Ending the Game

The game ends once all pairs have been captured out of the Slapping Field. Should the game in a tie, 5 pairs placed back in the Slapping Field for a SlapOff. The first player to capture a pair wins the game.

One alternative to the win condition is to have the first player to capture five pairs wins the game.

Family Game Assessment

Slap Down can be a great family game for the right family. The rules are very straightforward, easy to understand , and the game can be learned in just a matter of minutes. That said, the game is very competitive and care must be taken to avoid injury. In the games that we played, even with extra care being taken there were a few scratched fingers as we both dove for the same cards. With the right group dynamic, this game involves lots of laughter and frantic silliness to make their pairs

Conclusion

If you are looking for a easy to learn fast and light family game Slap Down is a perfect fit for anyone looking for a frantic and fast game.

FCC disclosure: a copy of Slap Down! was provided for review.

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Families everywhere have adapted and settled into the new normal. We are all continuing to practicing social distancing and staying home more. The uncertainty of current events is stressful and frightening for a lot of families. Sometimes, the only answer is a good laugh. Below is a list of relatively inexpensive games that are all fun to play.

Note: The links for these games are Amazon Affiliate links. if you click these links and buy the games, then EFG will get a small amount of revenue from your purchase.

Exploding Kittens

Exploding Kittens is one of the silliest games in my collection, and is a family favorite. You can play as many cards as you like and you end your turn by drawing a card. If the card is an exploding kitten and you cannot defuse it you are out of the game. The last person standing wins. That’s it. The game really is that simple. The design is such that you never need to reshuffle the discard pile into the deck. There will always be a winner by the time the cards run out.  Check out the review here.

Not Parent Approved

If you are looking for something to get everyone laughing then check out Not Parent Approved. It is played in the same style as Apples to Apples or Cards Against Humanity, with one player as the judge and the rest of the players trying to provide the best answer to the prompt card. The game has a large range of cards, and for younger players, parents may want to screen the cards for content.

Happy Salmon/Funky Chicken

Happy Salmon is really, really stupid. But, in the best ways. This is a great game for motivating your family to get up, laugh, and shout their way through a game. You can even buy two copies (there are two different color versions) so you can get up to 8 players. That is WILD.

Funky Chicken, just like Happy Salmon above, is also really, really stupid. But, it is stupid in the best possible way. The game play is similar enough that if you like one of them, then you should definitely get the other.

Invasion of the Cow Snatchers

Invasion of the Cow Snatchers is also a single player game with a hilarious theme from Think Fun. In this game players are collecting cows represented by colored disks, and the red bull must be collected last. There are fences of different heights that add challenges to each puzzle.

Shaky Manor

Shaky Manor is a game unlike any I have ever played before, where each player is given a tray containing eight square rooms each connected by doorways. Players place an meeple, a ghost, and three treasure chest cubes into the tray. They then shake the tray to try and get the meeple and the cubes into a designated room without the ghost. The first player to do it five times is the winner. The game is noisy, silly, and loads of fun!

Loopin’ Chewie

Loopin’ Chewie is the quintessential family game. With it simple set up, simple gameplay, and fast play it encourages multiple plays in one setting. The format allows for multi age and multi generation play, by being so simple and requiring little skill or strategy.

Loopin’ Chewie has a player elimination style with a bit of a twist. Once all 3 storm troopers are knocked below a player is no longer eligible to win the game. They may however continued to play and try to knock the millennium Falcon into the storm troopers of their opponents. The last player with with Storm Troopers at the end wins the game. See the review here.

Hoagie

Hoagie is a sandwich building game where each player is trying to build the perfect sandwich without any part getting spoiled by three oogies. It has a level of gross that kids and adults will find entertaining.  Hoagie is a light game that can be played with multiple ages all together making it a great game for the whole family. See the review here.

Unstable Unicorns

Unstable Unicorns is a card combat game that features whacky unicorns as you build an army. The art is adorable and gameplay loop as you pass between turns feels very similar to Magic: The Gathering (and I mean that in a good way). We enjoy it every time we play.

Go Nuts for Donuts

Go Nuts For Donuts is a card drafting and set collection game where players are trying to collect the best donuts to eat.  Really, what better topic for a game can you have beside collecting donuts! Player bid on the different donuts available in the donut row. Players bid in secret, and at the end of the bidding players may only collect those donuts where they are the sole bidder. Each kind of the 21 kinds donut ( and two beverages) has either points it gains you, an action you can take immediately upon retrieving the card, or both. The artwork and text on the cards are fun and adorable and sure to make you smile.

What Do You Meme: Family Edition

What Do You Meme is a hilarious game that invites players to create funny memes using a stack of funny pictures straight from the deepest corners of the internet and a huge deck of caption cards. The problem is that the original version of the game is a bit… grown-up for our tastes. The good news for all of us is that there is a bespoke Family edition of the game that replaces the sex and drugs with fart jokes (which just makes it all around better in my opinion). Just look at the box. It’ll all make sense. This is the definitive edition of the game!


What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

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The holidays are approaching quickly and some amazing new games have come out this year. The EFG team was fortunate to have been able to see most of these games in person at New York Toy Fair early this year. There are so many more games than we can fit into one article, so if you need more ideas check out the links at the bottom to other articles that may inspire your gift shopping or wishlist creation.


Games for the Whole Family

These games are easy to learn, and perhaps hard to master games that can be enjoyed by a wide range of players. These games are great for multi age game play and less experienced gamers.

Dungeon Drop

The titular “Dungeon” in Dungeon Drop is created by dropping an assortment of colored cubes onto the play surface. Each colored cube represents a different object ranging from grey pillars (which help form the rooms) to orange keys, and green Boblins. This simple gameplay loop can be taught in a few minutes and gameplay is fast.

Ship Shape

If you are looking for a unique and engaging game, Ship Shape is a great choice. It is a 3-D puzzle game where you take on the roll of a Captain trying to fill the hold of your ship with  treasure, cannons, and contraband to try and get the most coins for the visible contents. With the recommended age beginning at eight years old, this is a game that is great for so many members of the family.

Starlink

Try and seal your victory in Starlink by creating constellation. This party style drawing game is engaging and can play three to six players. Players draw a secret word and on their turn they need to try and draw the secret object by connecting stars. Players earn bonus points for fitting their constellation inside the telescope circle.

Abandon All Artichokes

Build your hand of garden vegetables by deconstructing your deck of artichokes. In Abandon All Artichokes, players start with a hand of all artichoke cards. The goal is to abandon their artichoke cards and create a hand with other vegetables from the garden. This is a great deck builder game for players new to that style of game.

Back to the Future

The story of Back to the Future comes to life in this cooperative board game. Just as in the movie, you need to fix the 1955 timeline by repairing the DeLorean, getting the clock tower ready, and keeping Marty’s parents love on track before the picture fades. Back to the Future-Back in Time features some unique touches including the dog Einstein as a playable character, and the clock tower doubling as a dice tower.

If You Like…

So many games are released each year. There are some old favorites that publishers re-imagine, and many times these games can become our new favorites.

Marvel Splendor

The Marvel Universe has been merged with Splendor. This new version included new tactics, new updates to the rules and new win conditions. Players need to gain infinity points using the Infinity gems. They use these to recruit heroes and villains, and when the right moment arrives, claim the Infinity Gauntlet.

Tsuro Phoenix Rising

Tsuro Phoenix Rising add some great new components to the classic Tsuro game. In Phoenix Rising, players now have double sided tiles that sit in a special tray so they can be flipped over during gameplay. Unlike the original, if you are sent off the board, it does not mean you are out. Instead you can be reborn from the ashes once per game, and continue playing.

Dragomino

The game Kingdomino took the boardgame world by storm winning the Spiel De Jahres in 2017. Now there is a My First version that is for players ages five and up, with a dragon theme. Dragonmino takes the same tile drafting and placement mechanism, and simplified it further for younger players. With each match with the tiles players earn a dragon egg and are trying to collect eggs with baby dragons inside.

Dragon’s Breath the Hatching

Dragon’s Breath The Hatching fits into two categories: Games for Young Gamers and If You Like. Haba took the popular Dragon’s Breath game, which is a great game for young gamers, to the next step. The Hatching is a versatile addition to any family’s game collection. It can be a stand alone game, or expansion to the original Dragon’s Breath game. As an expansion it adds a fifth player.

Games for Young Gamers

Duck Duck Dance

Duck Duck Dance is a movement game for players age two and up. There are three simple steps to the game. First roll the over-sized dice to reveal dance moves, perform the dance moves, then flip card on the board to reveal an audience member. The game ends when all audience members are revealed. Duck Duck Dance incorporates many skills needed for toddlers: Gross Motor, Sequencing, Counting, Imitation, Turn Taking, and Vocabulary building.

Panda’s Picnic

Panda’s Picnic in the Park is a matching game for players age two and up. The game comes in a picnic basket and players take turns pulling items out of the basket and matching them with things on their plate. There are multiple ways to play. Learning skills include: Color and Shape. Pretend play, turn taking, gross and fine motor skills, and vocabulary building.

Bandit’s Memory Mix Up

Bandits Memory Mix Up is a game for two to four players ages three and up which challenges memory. This game has players take the spy glass and placed five garden tiles inside then shake it up. One garden tile is removed secretly. The challenge: remembering the removed tile. The first player to identify the missing tile wins. There are also variants which support solo and large group play. Play reinforces the skills of turn-taking, visual discrimination, and memory.

Smoosh and Seek Treehouse

Smoosh and Seek Tree house is a cooperative game for two to four players ages three and up. In this game players are working together to find all the different Woodland animals playing hide and seek in the tree before Mr. Prickles climbs the ladder. Players worked together to remember the location of the different seekers when they think they have located a seeker they state who they think it is pick up the disk and smash it into the smash to to reveal who’s hiding. If they successfully find a hide or they place a token to show that seekers has been found. Game play reinforces memory, simple strategy, cooperation and fine-motor skills.

2020 Award Winning Games

Pictures

The 2020 Spiel Des Jahres  winner Pictures is a unique party game that takes place over five rounds. The game begins with a field of 16 photo cards placed in a four by four grid. Then each player uses a series of unique items to best represent one picture. Items include: 2 Shoelaces, 6 Wooden, Building Blocks, Wooden cubes and Picture frame, picture cards in a hand drawn style, and 4 Sticks plus 4 Stones.

Once the pictures are recreated, each player guesses which pictures the objects represent. Players earn points by correctly guessing, and having your picture correctly guessed. Materials pass, allowing all players to use all five different materials, and the creating beings again.

The Crew

The 2020 Kennerspiel Des Jahres, the Crew combines two unique gaming styles, cooperative and trick taking. Players take on the roll of a space crew trying to complete missions. The rule books tells the story of each mission as well as the conditions players need to follow to succeed. Once a mission is completes successfully players can move on to the next mission. The game has 50 mission, which increase in intensity both within the story and in the requirements needed to be successful. For a small game, and modest number of components there is a lot of game packed into the small box.

For More Gift Ideas

To support families during the unique times we are in, we put together some articles this spring. These articles suggest some great games that would also make great gifts. Plus the EFG Essentials is our “go to” collection of games that we recommend.


What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

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Every week the EFG staff will be defining a gaming term that is either confusing or ill-defined. Please leave a comment with any terms you are confused by and we will try to include them in future editions!


Social Deduction is a mechanic found in both video games and board games. In a Social Deduction game, players have a hidden roll and/or objective. The other players try to deduce the roll of their opponents based in the choices and actions they take. In many Social Deduction games player roles are secretly assigned. Depending on their role, player may have a different win condition or objective.

These games often call for players to lie, be deceitful, and try and undermine the other players, which can be challenging for some, and especially for younger players.

Social Deduction games, especially with hidden traitors, often have themes suited for older kids and adults. The target audience typically included teens and up across both board and video games.

Board Game Example

Human Era, players are randomly and secretly assigned the role of crew members in the last time machine. Players need to save space and time from the chaos created by human time travel. However, there is a problem, some crew members are machines or cyborgs (half humans-half machines) who have their own agenda.

Video Game Example

Among Us is a popular online app and Steam game. Players are on a spaceship and there is at least one imposer, who is an alien. Players have to figure out the impostors, before the impostors kill too many humans. The humans try to decide who is a alien and throw them out of the ship.


Thinking critically about the games our kids play and the way that our kids play them provides great insight. It is also a great way to connect with them. You’ll understand the games they enjoy better. You might even enjoy them a little better too!

What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

The EFG Essentials

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Journey through story local games to three regions of Africa in South of the Sahara by MathMinds Games. This is a cross-curricular game that weaves Math, Literacy, and Social Studies into the fabric of the game. The design for South of the Sahara has applications with students in a classroom, homeschooling, or families. There are three games within South of the Sahara with additional variants for each game. The games are for players ages seven and up. All the games combined supports two to eight players, and games are 10- 30 minutes. Gamplay is taught in a storybooks format. Chapter one and two teach a game play variants each, increasing in difficulty. The second chapter also introduces the math connection, while chapter three delves deeper into the math, and add some history or social studies connections too.

Achi:

Achi is a two player game that originated in Ghana. The game storybook connects the game to tic-tac-toe. Connections are made in the storybook to a turtle shell and the magic square originating in China.

Game Components

  • Double sided board
    • one side is a 9 dot grid
    • other side lines shift and there are numbers on all the spots
  • 4 red triangles
  • 4 blue squares

Gameplay

Chapter1: Players take turns placing their pieces with the objective to get three in a row. The game is basically tic-tac-toe, but there is one major difference, the game cannot end in a draw. Players only have 4 pieces each, so there is always a vacant space. If there is not three in a row, players then slide one piece on each move until there is a winner.

Chapter 2: On the game board side with numbers, there are still nine spaces numbered one to nine. The objective this time is to have three of your numbers add to 15. Once all pieces are on the board players may use their turn to slide a piece to try and reach the 15 total with three of their pieces.

Gulugufe

Gulugufe connects a discovery of butterflies in Mozambique and links it to pancakes to explain the mathematical concept of negation.

Game Components

  • Double sided game board, one side is for two player the reverse if for four player
  • Wooden cylinders with 1/-1 on each flat face
    • 9 each of four different colors ( Yellow, Green, Blue, Red)

Gameplay

Chapter1: This game is playable with two or four players by using the game board side with the side that matches the number of player Players are trying to remove the caterpillars of their opponents (represented by wooden cylinders). To remove a caterpillar you “crawl over” a piece that is next to yours. The piece must be in s straight line and have a vacant space on the opposite side. Players can knock off as many pieces as possible on their turn, and must make a move even if it leaves their piece in a vulnerable position.

Chapter 2: Opposite Sides of the Branch incorporates the idea of negative and positive numbers . Negative represents the caterpillar bring under the branch and positive 1 represents being on top of the branch and -1 under the branch. Players can only know off a caterpillar that is on the same side of the branch as they are. Players can also take their turn to flip over one of there pieces or one of their opponents pieces.

Fanorona

Fanorona takes place on the island of Madagascar and incorporates the national animal; the lemur. In this game the lemurs are pushing or tripping their opponents. The last player with a piece on the board wins.

Components

  • Two sets of 22 hexagonal wooden pieces with the numbered 1-22, one yellow set and one purple set
  • Double sided board (square grid and rectangular grid)

Gameplay

Chapter One: Falling Lemurs, uses the blank side of the game pieces General game play takes on the idea that lemurs are unstable when they stand on two feet. So, players “push” or “trip” their opponents to remove them from the board. To push move forward into an empty space in front of your opponent. All opposing pieces in a straight line are removed from the board. This represents the lemurs falling over. The falling lemurs line stops when there is a space or the other players token in the way.

To trip, players can envision a tail sweep. To execute this move in the game, players begin directly in front of their opponent’s piece, and move backwards on space. Just like with the push any opposing pieces in a straight line are removed.

Chapter 2: Lemur Ages adds in the numbers on the game tokens. To knock over Lemurs the player must decide what group of lemurs they are knocking over. Players need to decide if they want to make younger, older or same age fall over compared to their piece. This gameplay decision incorporates the mathematical concept of greater than, less than, and equal to.

Family Game Assessment

South of the Sahara is a cute series of mini games, and a good fit for families with early elementary children. The games are quick and easy to learn. Most are two player and are simple enough that two children can play independently together. When playing some of these games, it surprised me how engaging the gameplay was. While simple there was more strategy than I first anticipated.

Educational Assessment

In an early elementary classroom or homeschool setting, specifically in first and second grade, these games are a great way to reinforce mathematical skills as well as turn taking and good sportsmanship. Per the MathMinds website, the game stories are a 3rd grade reading level and are available in English and Spanish. The Achi skills of the magic square and adding to 15 hits multiple stands of the Operations and Algebraic Thinking (OA) in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Negation, introduced in Gulugufe, does not typically get introduced formally until the upper elementary grade. However it is easily understandable by primary students especially with the below the branch visual. The skills of greater than, less than, equal introduced in Fanorona align with first grade skills (CCSS NBT B3).

These games are well suited for small group at a teacher station to learn and then to be available as center. The stories engaging children and remain simple enough for whole or small group read alouds. The cross curricular nature of South of the Sahara optimizes the instructional time in already packed school schedule.

Final Thoughts

The game play and math skills infused in South of the Sahara make it a useful tool in both a home and school environment. The gameplay is engaging that it can be played multi age. For gamification of some primary math skills infused with story and multicultural learning, this is cute and entertaining.

FCC Disclosure: A copy of South of the Sahara was provided for review.

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Education has made a drastic shift, and distance learning has become a major instructional format. Parents and caregivers now must facilitating their children’s distance learning. Distance learning has evolved from the first versions in March and April, yet it still presents challenges. Any tools that encourage hands on work and engage children are more valuable than ever.

Below are some games that are easily available, or you may already have on your shelf at home. These games support educational concepts in a way that is more fun and approachable. Games by no means replace the schoolwork and instruction, but they are a nice supplement. Check out your game collection and see what games you have with educational elements too.

STEM Games

Roller Coaster Challenge and Gravity Maze are single player puzzle STEM games. Each game has a series of cards with challenges that get increasingly more difficult. These are all engaging with hands on, that encourage problem solving and flexible thinking. While these are single player families can create opportunities for collaboration. Kids and adults love to build and see their construction succeed.

See the reviews of Gravity Maze here.

Coding

Understanding coding is a critical 21st century skill. There are several great board games that teach the skills of coding.

The most well know is Robot Turtles, which hit the world by storm on Kickstarter in 2013. It is simple and super fun.  The goal is for kids to place directional cards on a board to get their turtle to a matching colored jewel. It starts out easy, but as your child learns, you can add obstacles to make it more complex.   The children get to be the programmers and take control by playing out cards.  See our review here.

Two other great coding games are Coder Bunny and Coder Mindz both created by Samaira Mehta as a second and fourth grader respectively.  Coder Bunny gives players thirteen variations of ways to play, which incorporate different elements of coding. Coder Bunnyz also has a strong educational benefit.  It introduces the basics of coding in a friendly and accessible format. Younger beginning players benefit from coaching and direct instruction on the best way to program the motion of their bunny.  Older and more experienced players can create greater challenges with the board layout to refine their strategic thinking and problem-solving skills.

Coder Mindz presents the concepts of coding in an accessible format for a young player, but it is also engaging for older players.  Having three modes of play with two levels of difficulty at each level makes the game easy to scale based on the age of the players as well as the experience they have with creating code.

See the review of Coder Bunny here, and Coder Mindz here.

Reading

In Blurble, players race to say a word first that starts with the same letter as the picture on the card. There are lots of additional educational options with the cards too. Blurble contains a booklet labeled Educational Exercises. Within it explains other uses of the cards in Blurble as an educational tool for parents. The activities include Object Identification/Vocabulary, Spelling, Storytelling, Identifying Characteristics, Information Retrieval, and Group games. These activities range for ages 2 with object identification to age 11 with storytelling.  See the review here.

Spot It and Spot it Jr. are simple, inexpensive, and your child has a decent shot at beating you in it. This is a matching game with several variables of play.  There is one matching picture on every card so you are trying to be the first to find the matching picture.  This is great for even the youngest gamers and helps to develop their observational skills, and language. There is also an alphabet version that can develop letter identification.

Zingo is a bingo game that incorporates a Zinger, which distributes the tiles. Kids love using the Zinger and it adds a fun component to the game. Thinkfun has also created  multiple versions of Zingo. They include: Zingo 1-2-3Zingo Sight Words, Zingo Time-Telling, and Zingo Word Builder.  These can be great ways to develop beginning reading and math skills, and for preschool and primary students the Zingo variations are a great fit.  

Math

Cross Curricular Connections

Zeus on the Loose has players building up “Mount Olympus” which is the discard pile, to equal 100, but watch out, by playing a Greek God all kinds of special powers can happen. On their turn “Mount Olympus”, the discard pile and state the new total for the pile. This is a great way to practice mental addition to 100. The Greek gods themselves can also be a launching point for reading about the Greek myths, or other books incorporating Greek Mythology, such as the Rick Riordan books.

Number Recognition

Roll For It! is a simple and quick dice and card game. The object of the game is to be the first player to collect 40 points by managing dice and matching the appropriate dice to the cards in play, which is perfect in building subitizing in young children. Subitizing is where you can look at the pips on a dice, or at a small group of objects and instantly know the number without counting. One of the best features of Roll For It! is its simplicity. Players who do not play games often will pick up this game and understand how to play after seeing one turn. See the review here.

Addition and Subtraction


Skyjo is a set collection card game for two to eight players were your goal is to get the least amount of points per around. The recommended age is for eight and up. The game does scale down especially once children can understand the negative cards by relating them to take away. Unknown cards in front of each player and fifteen different cards that can be revealed, gives Skyjo just enough suspense to provide just a bit of tension in the game.

Creating Sets and Probability

Dragonwood is a light set collection game with a fantasy theme and beautiful art. You take on the roll of an adventurer defeating monsters. Players have three different ways to defeat a monster and each attack requires a different type of collection. Players can collect sets of the same card, the same color, or numbers in sequence. These different ways to sort cards helps support flexible thinking probability, and sequencing.

Science

Life Science

Photosynthesis is a beautiful science themed game that features the tree life cycle and a rotating sun to collect light points. The trees are three dimensional and provide a beautiful visual as the forest “grows”. Photosynthesis plays in rounds. Each round consists of two phases: the Photosynthesis Phase and the Life Cycle Phase. The game ends after the sun makes three complete revolutions around the board.  Points are then calculated based on scoring tokens and unused light points. See the review here.

The Evolution Series by North Star Games has multiple games in this line. In the Evolution games you are evolving your creatures with various traits to help their survival. Each animal needs to have enough food or they die out and can go extinct. There is something for everyone in this series. For elementary age students you can start with Evolution: The Beginning. This is a simplified and streamlined version of the game good for ages eight and up. For older children: Evolution, Flight (which is an expansion), Climate, and Oceans.

Physics

Ice Cool is a flicking game about penguins in a frozen high school. Players take turns flicking their penguin pawns through the halls. The goal is to get your pawn through open doorways to catch fish  and earn points. This is more complicated because each player takes a turn as the hall monitor who’s objective is to catch the other players. Ice Cool is more fun than I expected and the kids love it. You may be wondering how this helps with science, and this is where it helps to think outside the box. All the shots you are making involve Physics!

Ice Cool 2 is the sequel to the original Ice Cool game. If you combine it with the original Ice Cool game you can play up to eight players and set up multiple layouts. These new layout options can also become a learning tool for Physics may lead to finding which setup creates easier shots and which produce more complicated shots.


What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

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October is a time for monsters, zombies, and all kinds of creepy creatures to get into the sprite of Halloween. There are many horror-themed games, but the themes can be too dark and intense for many kids (and maybe some adults). This collection of games have light themes and graphics that lend themselves to the Halloween season without being dark or too scary. While teens may be able to delve into the horror genre, the games below are more fitting for the younger members of the family preferring lighter Halloween themes.

Disney Hocus Pocus: The Game

The Movie Hocus Pocus has become synonymous with Halloween, and now it is also a game from Ravensburger. Disney Hocus Pocus the Game is a cooperative game for two to six players ages eight and up. Just as in the movie, players are working together to protect the children and stop the Sanderson sisters from completing their potion all before the sun rises. Players win if they can successfully ruin the Sanderson sister’s potion three times before the sun rises. In an interesting twist players can not share their hands, but may ask certain questions which can only be answered by a yes or no.

Zombie Dice

Zombie Dice is a very easy push your luck game and can be handled by children 6 and up, even though it is suggested for a slightly older audience. Our guess is that they labeled it for 10 and older because zombies are scary. But, if you have kids in your house, you know that zombies and gross things are fascinating to kids. The dice are simple icons, and not scary or overly creepy. The scariest part of the game is the art on the container for the game.

Shaky Manor

Shaky Manor is a fun dexterity game that gets everyone shaking! In Shaky Manor each player has a tray containing eight square rooms each connected by doorways. Players place an meeple, an ghost, and three treasure chest cubes into the tray. They then shake the tray to try and get the meeple and the cubes into an designated room without the ghost. The first player to do it five times is the winner. The game comes with an number of other interesting game bits. They ranged from eyeballs and snakes spiders.

Push a Monster

Push a Monster is an adorable a dexterity game which was nominated for the Kinderspiel des Jahres (Children’s Game of the Year) in 2015, and is for players ages five and up. The monsters are gathered in the Monster Arena and more monsters are trying to join, but if there is not enough room, and the monsters keep falling off the arena. The game play is very simple to learn for young player. Roll a die, place the monster you roll, and try not to let any other monsters fall. If you knock any off the rest of the players score points. Push a Monster is a great way to play with monsters that are cute and not scary for the younger players.

One Night Ultimate Werewolf

If you have a big family or can get a group of friends together, One Night Ultimate Werewolf is a great party game. The game is for three to ten players ages eight and up. While it can be for as little as three players, it works better with a larger group. Players are randomly given a secret roll at the beginning of the game. Some rolls include: Tanner, Villager, Seer, Troublemaker, and Werewolf. Different roles have different power, and depending on your roll you are Team Villager or Team Werewolf. The players go through “one night” which is the phase when players use their abilities. After the “one night” phase ends, then player ultimately have five minutes to talk, try determine, and vote on the players they think are the werewolves.

Broom Service

Broom Service was the Kennerspiel des Jahres (connoisseur/expert game of the year) winner for 2015. This is a trick taking game where players take on the role of witches and druids in a flying delivery services. The game is for two to five plays ages ten and up. Every round players must choose different roles, and they have a choose to be brave or cowardly. The Brave option holds more reward, but also more risk. Will the risks or the caution pay off as you make deliveries?

Cauldron Quest

Cauldron Quest is a cooperative game that will fit right at home in any house full of Harry Potter fans. It is for players 6 and up and plays two to four players. Players are working together in Cauldron Quest to brew a magic potion that their kingdom needs to break a magic spell cast by an evil wizard. They do this by trying to move special barrels of ingredients from the outside of the board into the cauldron in the center. This might SOUND easy, but the evil wizard is trying to stop them by putting magic barriers in the way. Players need to get the correct three ingredients to the center before the wizard blocks all six paths.

The Quacks of Quedlinburg: The Herb Witches

The Quacks of Quedlinburg is an award winning game. It was named the Kennerspiel De Jahares (connoisseur/expert game of the year) in 2018. The Quacks of Quedlinburg is a push you luck game for two to four players ages ten and up. You take on the roll of a miracle surgeon or perhaps “quack” doctor making special portions and brews for all kinds of ailments by drawing ingredients from a bag.

North Star games released an expansion to The Quacks of Quedlinburg : The Herb Witches. The expansion adds a fifth player to the game, additional ingredients, as well as three Herb Witches.

Last Defense

The city is under attach from various threats ranging from Spider Robots to Space Aliens. Players work together in this cooperative game to try and save the city, and they only have 20 minutes. The game has a companion app that is required for game play. One of the unique features is that one of the playable characters is Good Dog. It is so cool to be able to play a hero that is not a human.

Ghost Fightin Treasure Hunter

​Ghost Fightin’ Treasure Hunters is an amazing cooperative game for the whole family to enjoy. The game is for  For 2-4 players, age 8 and up. Ghost Fightin’ Treasure Hunters was the winner of the 2014 Kinderspiel des Jahres (Children’s Game of the Year) award. Players work together to collect and escape the house before too many rooms become haunted. Players may also need to fight ghosts or haunting.

King of Tokyo: Halloween

Attacking Aliens, Rampaging Lizards, Giant Robots, Mutant Bugs, and Ferocious Gorillas: this game has them all! King of Tokyo is a game for two to six players that combines a board game, a dice game and a card game. You play as one monster whose main goals are to destroy Tokyo and battle other monsters in order to become the one and only King of Tokyo! Each turn consists of 4 steps: rolling and re-rolling the dice, resolving the dice, buying cards and using their effects, and the end of turn decision.

King of Tokyo Halloween is an expansion, and remains for two to six players. The game plays in about 30 minutes and adds two new monsters  Boogie Woogie & Pumpkin Jack. The game also includes their evolutions, and costume cards. The costumes can also be stolen!

Zombie Kidz Evolution

Your successes or failors affect the game in your future plays of the game, in Zombie Kidz Evolution. This is a perfect first step into Legacy games, that are played over a series of sessions and what occurrences in previous sessions affect the next events in the game. Zombie Kidz Evolution is for player ages seven and up and has fifteen minute play sessions. In this cooperative game you are trying to work together to protect yourselves and drive off the zombies. It is set in a school and has all the adults as the zombies.

Disney The Haunted Mansion Call of the Spirits

The Haunted Mansion is a new game from Funko Games. This is one of the games we got to get a sneak peek of at Toy Fair in New York. The Haunted Mansion is a set collection game for two to six players ages eight and up. Players can acquire two kinds of cards: Ghost Cards and Haunt Cards. The game has an “Endless Hallway” piece in the center of the board. This is a lazy Susan turntable. There are eight different areas to explore on the game board, and these are right from the Haunted Mansion ride at Disney. The hitchhiking ghosts from the ride are also featured in the game.

What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

Make sure to keep your eyes on Engaged Family Gaming for all of the latest news and reviews you need to Get Your Family Game On!

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From the quiet librarian to the rock star. This Game Goes to Eleven is a light card game with an equally light rock theme. It is for two to six players ages eight and up, and takes approximately 20 minutes.

Components


• 72 cards
• Guitar pick


Gameplay

In This Game Goes to Eleven, each player is dealt a hand of 3 cards. Players take turns putting down one card with the goal of getting all the cards in the pile to reach a total of eleven. When you play your card, if the total is less than eleven, play moves to the next player. Should you put down a total equaling exactly eleven you give the pile of cards to the player of your choice. However, if your card makes the pile total over 11 you must take the entire pile of cards.


There are two special cards in the deck. The first is the number eleven, and his card instantly brings the pile to eleven. You then give it to the player of your choice. The other is the Librarian which is zero. This card does 1 of 2 things 1 way to use this card is to place it on top of the pile and reset the pile to 0. The other way to do it is to counteract a 11 card and the person who played the 11 now must take the pile. The goal of the game is to have the fewest number of cards at the end. The values on the cards are irrelevant to the score.

Variant

The variant incorporates the included guitar pick. The guitar pick designates which player gets the pile instead of the player deciding. Once the pile equals eleven, the pick holder must collect the pile. The pick then passes to the next player. This changes the dynamic of selecting who receives the pile versus having it in turn, and is a helpful variant with children so they feel the pile collection is more equitable.

Family Game Assessment

This Game Goes to Eleven is a perfect light family game. While recommended for ages eight and up, the game scales down for younger children that can do simple computation up to eleven. The game is extremely easy to teach at has very few rules. Players on their turn merely have to select one of the three cards in their hand to play and try to strategize with those limited choices. This is a good fit for young gamers or non gamers since the rules are simple and streamline. The limited choice in what to do on your turn and limited strategy also keeps turns simple.. There is an element of luck in the game with what numbers you pick up when you draw at the end of your turn. However, having three card does allow a bit of strategy into the game to keep it interesting.

This is also a game that would work multi generational since there is limited skill and strategy incorporated.

Final Thoughts

For a light family game that can include multi ages or generations This Game Goes to Eleven is a great addition to a family collection. You can crank this game up to an eleven and enjoy laughs around the table.

What do you think? Sound off in the comments and let us know your thoughts!

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The Spiel Des Jahres awards go to the best board games released in a German speaking country during the previous year or current year. The award is a high prestige for the winner.  There are three awards each year: The Spiel Des Jahres (The Game of the Year), the Kinderspiel Des Jahres (Children’s Game of the year), and the Kennerspiel Des Jahres (Connoisseur Game of the year).

Spiel Des Jahres 

Pictures

  • Party Game
  • 3-5 players
  • Ages 8+
  • Play time: 30 Minutes
  • US Publisher: Rio Grande Games

Pictures is a unique party game that takes place over five rounds. The game begins with a field of 16 photo cards placed in a four by four grid. Then each player uses a series of unique items to best represent one picture. The kinds of objects are radically different and each have their own challenges.

Materials sets used to recreate photo:

  • 2 Shoelaces
  • 6 Wooden Building Blocks
  • Wooden cubes and Picture frame
  • picture cards, hand drawn style
  • 4 Sticks, 4 Stones

Once the pictures are recreated, each player guesses which pictures the objects represent. Players earn points by correctly guessing, and having your picture correctly guessed. Materials pass, allowing all players to use all five different materials, and the creating beings again.

Runners up:

  • My City by Reiner Knizia
  • Nova Luna by Uwe Rosenberg and Corné van Moorsel

Kinderspiel Des Jahres

Speedy Roll

  • Dexterity Game
  • 1-4 players
  • Ages 4+
  • Play time: 20 Minutes
  • Publisher:  Lifestyle Boardgames / Piatnik

Speedy roll is an adorable and versatile game for young players. The little hedgehogs want to get home, but they are hungry along the way. The game uses two different components for the hedgehogs: an adorable felt ball with eyes and wooden hedgehog meeples. Players roll the felt ball hedgehog through a field of mushrooms, leaves, and apples, which are tokens with a velcro back to collect food. The food collected is what directs the meeple’s journey along the path. However, too much food weights you down, and you do not move at all.

What is unique about this game is there is the option to play it competitively or cooperatively. When playing competitively, the hedgehogs are racing to be the first one home. In the cooperative version, there is only one hedgehog and he is trying to get home before the fox catches him.

Speedy Roll is not currently available in the United States.

Runners Up:

  • Photo Fish by Michael Kallauch 
  • We are the Robots by Reinhard Staupe

Kennerspiel Des Jahres

The Crew: Quest for Planet 9

  • Cooperative Trick Taking Game
  • 3 to 5 players
  • Ages 10+
  • Play time: 20 Minutes per mission
  • Publisher:  Kosmos

The Crew combines two unique gaming styles, cooperative and trick taking. Players take on the roll of a space crew trying to complete missions. The rule books tells the story of each mission as well as the conditions players need to follow to succeed. Once a mission is completes successfully players can move on to the next mission. The game has 50 mission, which increase in intensity both within the story and in the requirements needed to be successful.

One additional challenge, players are limited on how much the can communicate. A communication token provides information once per mission, and is based on where it is place on the card placed on the table. Different locations communicate different information to the other players.

For a small game, and modest number of components there is a lot of game packed into the small box.

Runners Up:

  • The Cartographer by Jordy Adan
  • The King’s Dilemma by Lorenzo Silva, Hjalmar Hach and Carlo Burelli

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Bad Guy Nonsense is a strategic family card game by Marc Rienzo. It is live on Kickstarter and ends July 21st. The project is funded and you can back the game for $28. Check out the Kickstarter page here.

Can you give us a “Tale of the Tape” for your game? The title, genre, playtime, age ranges, etc

Bounty Hunters compete to capture fantastical characters in a strategic family CARD GAME for 2-4 players. It takes only 4 minutes to learn and is about 20- minutes to play.

What is the elevator pitch? 

An UNSPEAKABLE MONSTER has unleashed a wave of DARK NONSENSE matter across the cosmos… infecting countless life forms with a NONSENSE plague. As a member of The BOUNTY HUNTER collective, you must compete to capture the infected. But be wary of BURGLARS, BANDITS, HEROES, and the cosmic WITCH along the way… they’re infected too.

When is your Kickstarter going live?

It’s already live! ending very soon on July 21

Where are you in production/development? How close are you to complete? 

The game is complete, we just need backers!

Are there any other games that you think are comparable to your game? 

Not that I am aware of

You’re a game designer. You could have made any game you wanted. Why did you make THIS game? 

Comic Book films these days are all PG-13 or R Rated. As a father and film VFX professional, I found it frustrating many of these films were inappropriate to my young kids. So I created my own family-friendly comic book universe for like-minded parents & gamers to enjoy with their kids.

What was your design process like? 

It all began with index cards to figure out the gameplay, and then wet erase cards. The artwork and character design evolved as the gameplay evolved. At numerous points, the games was considered finished, but we really wanted it to be the best it could be so we’d rework every detail that we were not 100% on.

What is the number one reason why a family MUST purchase this game?

It’s popculture rich, yet family friendly with a sense of humor while also easy to learn and play!

How long has this game been in development? 

2 + years

What obstacles did you encounter making this game? 

COVID19

What did your first prototype look like? 

The first prototype was hideous, but so were the second and third! All in there were nearly a dozen prototypes before I was happy with the print quality and overall design & layout.

Why did you get into making games? 

I’ve always had a love for card games, and Bad Guy Nonsense was initially only intended for my family. But when I saw how much all their friends loved playing it too, and parent after parent started asking for copies… I knew I had something special to share.

What other information do you want us to know about you, your company, and/or your game?

Marc Rienzo is a VFX Supervisor, Artist, & Father with a love for Card Games, Comic Books and Star Wars. 20+ years of VFX experience including Marvel Studios, Disney, Bad Robot, ILM, Bruckheimer Films, Weta Digital, Digital Domain, Sony Imageworks, PDI Dreamworks, & many more.

You can find out more about Bad Guy Nonsense at:

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